G111 Continued

Post Reply
User avatar
joeq
Member
Posts: 4871
Joined: Sat. Feb. 11, 2012 11:53 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: G111, Southard Robertson
Stove/Furnace Make: Thermopride
Stove/Furnace Model: oil fired
Location: Northern CT

Post By: joeq » Wed. Nov. 22, 2017 4:47 pm

The start of a new season is "almost" upon...me. (I know you diehards have been burning since August)
Starting to prep the stove for firing. Took some of the cast internals to work, and grit blasted them to remove some accumulated surface rust that accrued from storing in my 3 season sunroom. On my drawcenter sliding cover, when removing the grate components for ash cleaning last spring, a small section of the cast slot broke off. (I don't have much luck in that area). Not too much of an operational problem, but something to patch...this long weekend.
Also need to check my SS chimney for bird ingestion issues. Wasn't fun last season removing the nesting and carcasses. Even with the chicken wire wrapped around the top cap, the little weasels poke their way inside.
And lastly I need to find my extra sheet of mica that I purchased a couple years ago. Anyone know where I stored it, (?) so I wouldn't lose it. The sheet on my door isn't so pleasing to look at, so I want to change it out. Anyway, I'll post some pics when I get going, and hope "Y'ALL" have a good Turkey day.
OFN.

Visit Hitzer Stoves

User avatar
freetown fred
Member
Posts: 23619
Joined: Thu. Dec. 31, 2009 12:33 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut
Location: Freetown,NY 13803

Post By: freetown fred » Wed. Nov. 22, 2017 5:15 pm

Joe, that mica's probably in the refrigerator where we ALL keep that kinda stuff!! LOL

franco b
Site Moderator
Posts: 9489
Joined: Wed. Nov. 05, 2008 5:11 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea
Location: Kent CT

Post By: franco b » Wed. Nov. 22, 2017 5:40 pm

Things you lose track of are usually in the last place you look, so look there first.

User avatar
SawDustJack
Member
Posts: 112
Joined: Fri. Jan. 15, 2016 6:12 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Newcastle/Ironhouse;Warm Morning 617a
Coal Size/Type: Stove/Nut
Location: Cape Cod

Post By: SawDustJack » Wed. Nov. 22, 2017 5:49 pm

As soon as you buy a replacement sheet you will find the one you are looking for....

User avatar
joeq
Member
Posts: 4871
Joined: Sat. Feb. 11, 2012 11:53 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: G111, Southard Robertson
Stove/Furnace Make: Thermopride
Stove/Furnace Model: oil fired
Location: Northern CT

Post By: joeq » Wed. Nov. 22, 2017 7:27 pm

LOL. you guys crack me up. All three of you are correct. And Fred, how'd you know it was in the fridge? I hid it under some carrot sticks, and the Mrs. said she busted it up, by using it as a chopping board. Guess I'll be buying a new one anyway. Stuff like this just drives me :baby:

User avatar
joeq
Member
Posts: 4871
Joined: Sat. Feb. 11, 2012 11:53 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: G111, Southard Robertson
Stove/Furnace Make: Thermopride
Stove/Furnace Model: oil fired
Location: Northern CT

Post By: joeq » Thu. Nov. 23, 2017 1:06 pm

Well, I looked everywhere for my last sheet of mica, (even in the last place), and it's a no show. Maybe I doubled up on the installed one. So I just put in "another" order to "Ashville-Schoonmaker" mica company out of Virginia, for more replacements. (5x7, 2 sheets, $35...free shipping) Don't know how long to ship, but with the weather still hitting 50s into next week, guess I can put er on hold for a bit more.

User avatar
Sunny Boy
Member
Posts: 15915
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post By: Sunny Boy » Thu. Nov. 23, 2017 1:18 pm

SawDustJack wrote:
Wed. Nov. 22, 2017 5:49 pm
As soon as you buy a replacement sheet you will find the one you are looking for....
That happens to me so often that it's like Noah's ark around here....... I have two of almost everything. :D

Paul

User avatar
joeq
Member
Posts: 4871
Joined: Sat. Feb. 11, 2012 11:53 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: G111, Southard Robertson
Stove/Furnace Make: Thermopride
Stove/Furnace Model: oil fired
Location: Northern CT

Post By: joeq » Thu. Nov. 23, 2017 1:48 pm

If only you could receive "2" pensions, and "2" SS checks, then you could store all them animals better, aye Paul? :lol:

Visit Hitzer Stoves

User avatar
joeq
Member
Posts: 4871
Joined: Sat. Feb. 11, 2012 11:53 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: G111, Southard Robertson
Stove/Furnace Make: Thermopride
Stove/Furnace Model: oil fired
Location: Northern CT

Post By: joeq » Sun. Dec. 03, 2017 11:32 am

So I did finally receive my new mica, and at 1st, wasn't too impressed with the quality. Quite a few imperfections on the 2 sheets. But I haven't bought lots of this stuff, so I'm not sure how difficult the process is to manufacture this stuff. In the end, it came out OK. I know I posted this replacement process in the past, but I'll do it again for anyone who missed it, or can't find it.
but 1st, this is a photo of how my stove has been looking the past "off" season.
Image
If it looks like it's lit, it's because of the night lite sitting on a bucket inside. Yous guys told me it was good to wart off moisture, but to me it also makes it look alive. :)
And here is the B4 pic of the mica after 1 seasons burn. (Frosty and speckled. Maybe cause I fired it on wood last season)
new mica 002.JPG
Using an 8 pt 3/8 socket, I removed the square nuts, and pulled out the worn mica.
new mica 003_LI.jpg
last time, I cut the new mica with scissors, and trimmed it tightly to shape the window. This year, I thought it would be better to not distress the new mica by making all those cuts, and run the risk of "delaminating", so I just cut off the corners to fit. (Actually, I was just being lazy :oops: ) I also used a 1/4" brad point bit backed up with some wood, to punch out the holes. I tried a hole punch at 1st, on some scrap, but it didn't work to well.
new mica 005_LI.jpg
And naturally, I couldn't get through the assy, W/O a snag. Because my eyes aren't as good as they use-ta be, and my memory is worse, I forgot about the 3 small "nubs" around the center pane, (1 on the bottom, and 2 on the top). Once I snugged the new mica into position, with the inner window support, I heard "cracking", as the bumps pushed their way through the mica that wasn't relieved.
new mica 006_LI.jpg
Fortunatel the splitting didn't make it's way to the viewing area, but had I have cut it out the previous way, I wouldn't have run into this. Live and learn
new mica 007.JPG
And here is the "after" shot. Worth the $15 investment, and the hour worth of screwing around. Now if it would only drop below 50° in our day time highs, I will fire this stove back up. wifey is bringing home some Matchlight, for the next winter, if it ever arrives.
new mica 009.JPG
Last edited by joeq on Sun. Dec. 03, 2017 3:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

franco b
Site Moderator
Posts: 9489
Joined: Wed. Nov. 05, 2008 5:11 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea
Location: Kent CT

Post By: franco b » Sun. Dec. 03, 2017 11:45 am

I remember reading in an old publication to cut mica with a scissors under water. How well this works I don't know. Maybe punching holes too?

User avatar
Pauliewog
Member
Posts: 1379
Joined: Mon. Dec. 02, 2013 12:15 am
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Alaska 140 Dual Paddle Feed
Baseburners & Antiques: Fame Rosemont #20, Home Stove Works #25, Glenwood #6, Happy Thought Oak, Merry Bride #214, Sunnyside, Worlds Argand #114, New Golden Sun , & About 30 others.
Coal Size/Type: Stove, Chesnut, Pea, Rice / Anthracite
Location: Pittston, Pennsylvania

Post By: Pauliewog » Sun. Dec. 03, 2017 12:49 pm

joeq wrote:
Sun. Dec. 03, 2017 11:32 am
So I did finally receive my new mica, and at 1st, wasn't too impressed with the quality. Quite a few imperfections on the 2 sheets. But I haven't bought lots of this stuff, so I'm not sure how difficult the process is to manufacture this stuff.
Joe,

Mica is a natural mineral formation and is either deep mined or surface mined like coal.

Sheet mica varies in color and clarity depending on the mine location and particular vein.

Here is a pretty good link:
https://mineralseducationcoalition.org/minerals-d ... base/mica/

I cut most of my mica with a paper cutter. :D

Paulie

User avatar
scalabro
Member
Posts: 3445
Joined: Wed. Oct. 03, 2012 9:53 am
Baseburners & Antiques: 2 Crawford 40's, PP Stewart No. 14, Abendroth Bros "Record 40"
Coal Size/Type: Stove / Anthracite.
Other Heating: Oil fired, forced hot air.
Location: Western Massachusetts

Post By: scalabro » Sun. Dec. 03, 2017 2:13 pm

Joe man light that candle!!!!

User avatar
joeq
Member
Posts: 4871
Joined: Sat. Feb. 11, 2012 11:53 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: G111, Southard Robertson
Stove/Furnace Make: Thermopride
Stove/Furnace Model: oil fired
Location: Northern CT

Post By: joeq » Sun. Dec. 03, 2017 3:38 pm

franco b wrote:
Sun. Dec. 03, 2017 11:45 am
I remember reading in an old publication to cut mica with a scissors under water. How well this works I don't know. Maybe punching holes too?
I'ld give that a try franco, but I just took down my pool, and don't own a wet suit. :baby:
And thanks for the mica link Paulie. I'll check it out.
Scott, I want to fire it up soon, but I just looked up my chimney cleanout, and see the creepo birds have clogged it AGAIN. Those nasty critters keep pecking their way past my safety wired chicken wire. They sure are persistent. Now I need to get back on the roof.

User avatar
Sunny Boy
Member
Posts: 15915
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post By: Sunny Boy » Mon. Dec. 04, 2017 7:58 am

I just use regular scissors, but they have to be sharp and not cheap ones with thin blades that can bend slightly away from each other as they make the cut. Otherwise, instead of cutting clean, dull scissors start to bend the mica before it's cut. It's that bending that causes the start of delaminating.

Paul

User avatar
joeq
Member
Posts: 4871
Joined: Sat. Feb. 11, 2012 11:53 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: G111, Southard Robertson
Stove/Furnace Make: Thermopride
Stove/Furnace Model: oil fired
Location: Northern CT

Post By: joeq » Mon. Dec. 04, 2017 4:24 pm

Another good point. Thanks Paul. Guess next time I won't be using my daughters old kindergarten scissors. By the way, I like your new avatar. Wish I could see it blown up. (The picture, not the stove :P )

Visit Hitzer Stoves

Post Reply

Return to “Hand Fired Coal Stoves & Furnaces Using Anthracite”