New Member, New Stove

Modern and vintage hand fired coal stove are similar to a wood stove and in some cases can burn either. They need to be regulated and fed by hand usually every 12 to 24 hours depending on your usage. They require no power to operate making them ideal for rural settings with long power outages.
Scottaw
Member
Posts: 132
Joined: Tue. Dec. 03, 2013 3:51 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Hitzer
Stove/Furnace Model: 50-93
Location: Spruce Creek, PA

Post Thu. Dec. 12, 2013 11:31 pm

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And there it is, installed with the paper and wood getting started, all loaded with coal and glowing, a dark room shot, and a final, all closed up and smoldering nicely.

I would like to thank everyone here for their help in getting me started, I've been reading a lot here for a few months which helped me pick the stove I wanted, and here it is...

My very first coal fire. Lit on the first try, and working perfectly within 2 hours.

I will of course keep you posted, and let you know when it inevitably burns itself out.

So, if I've got this right, tomorrow morning I will poke the fire a bit, shake the grates a few times, empty the ashpan, and fill the hopper.

It's 10 outside, with 5-8 inches of snow expected in the next two days, nothing like getting right into it.

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buck24
Member
Posts: 378
Joined: Sun. Feb. 28, 2010 5:47 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: New Buck Corp. / MODEL 24 COAL
Coal Size/Type: Pea, Nut / Anthracite
Location: NEPA/Pittston Twp. PA

Post Thu. Dec. 12, 2013 11:44 pm

Nice job. The stove looks good. Nothing like coal heat. Burn safe and stay warm.

Greyhound
Member
Posts: 178
Joined: Sun. Jul. 01, 2007 1:04 am
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 105
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Other Heating: Lenox Oil HA, Heat Pump
Location: Axemann, PA

Post Fri. Dec. 13, 2013 1:42 am

A belated welcome from someone a little closer to your location. It sounds like you have it all figured out, but if there was any room to spare in that small basement, you might consider an indoor bin if possible. It sure makes it nice not to have to go outside to fill buckets with days like we have had here recently, I have an outside bin now and sometimes, like today, regret it. I started with SuperSaks, but they just took up too much room in my too small garage.

Rick

Sunny Boy
Member
Posts: 12661
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post Fri. Dec. 13, 2013 7:10 am

Greyhound wrote:A belated welcome from someone a little closer to your location. It sounds like you have it all figured out, but if there was any room to spare in that small basement, you might consider an indoor bin if possible. It sure makes it nice not to have to go outside to fill buckets with days like we have had here recently, I have an outside bin now and sometimes, like today, regret it. I started with SuperSaks, but they just took up too much room in my too small garage.

Rick
I'll second that congrats on your first fire. And yes, if you can, an indoor bin will help you save. You went with coal to save. Everytime you open that outside door, there goes some of that heat your trying to save on.

And, it will save on labor. If you can use some of your "bucket room" that's so close, rather then shovel into buckets, then the stove, just shovel directly into the stove.
Paul
So many stoves - so few chimneys. I must be coal-stone crazy.

Scottaw
Member
Posts: 132
Joined: Tue. Dec. 03, 2013 3:51 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Hitzer
Stove/Furnace Model: 50-93
Location: Spruce Creek, PA

Post Fri. Dec. 13, 2013 7:46 am

All the coal I've bought so far is in the basement, just out of the picture. I have a bunch of heavy woven grain bags I got filled on my first trip, seems convenient so far.

Just did the morning shakedown, all still seems well. It was about 12 hours from getting it really going, still had a nice glowing bed and a mostly full hopper. Have it a few short shakes until I had a few glowing in the ashpan, filled the hopper and left the ash door vents open til it got rolling again. All the places I checked temps were very close to what they were last night. The wife was very happy at how warm it was this morning.

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jjs777_fzr
Member
Posts: 190
Joined: Wed. Jan. 07, 2009 8:17 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Penn Coal Stove & Chubby
Other Heating: CFM Wood Stove & Englander 25-PDVC Pellet Stove
Location: Northshore Massachusetts
Contact:

Post Fri. Dec. 13, 2013 8:35 am

Nice job and nice pics - thanks for sharing.
Talk about timing the install - you got that going just in time to put it through its paces!
Nothing better than biting cold single degree temps and walking into a glowing coal fire.
Wait till your wife sees you pick out small bits of unburned coal in the ash tray.
It's okay...I do it too...I just try to do it when no one is looking. I can't bare to see a few ounces get wasted.
Like I said - the timing is priceless - you get thing installed and bam! NorEaster forecast. Gotta luv it.

coalcracker
Member
Posts: 146
Joined: Mon. Jan. 24, 2011 6:33 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Standard sealed hot water boiler, hand fed
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark I Magnafire
Baseburners & Antiques: Lehigh Oak 18, Washington potbelly, Sears Roebuck parlor cabinet, PIttston 6 lid cook stove, vintage combo gas/coal cook stove 4 lid
Coal Size/Type: nut
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: Mark I Magnafire

Post Fri. Dec. 13, 2013 8:51 am

Scottaw wrote:Hi everyone, I've been researching here for about a year now and finally bought my first stove today. A local dealer had a very nice used Hitzer 50-93 that I couldn't pass up. Any other members in the central PA area? I'm in Spruce Creek and looking to find the best supplier. Thanks for all the info I've already found here.
enjoy heating and the huge cost savings of your new stove, it will give you many years of service. You're probably too far for our delivery suppliers here. The big 3 Hazleton strip mines are only about 5 miles from my house, I drove there and got anthracite with my F150. Are there any strip mines in your area ? If so you can save quite a bit picking it up yourself. When it was $210 delivered, the drive in cost here was $180. Now I'm hearing some are getting drive in price of $165. Just something to consider, that's a huge percentage discount.
Coal stoves without fuel, are heavy, expensive decorations. Are there any coal mines in YOUR home state ? If you talk the talk, you have to walk the walk.

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buffalo bob
Member
Posts: 727
Joined: Tue. Feb. 07, 2012 12:41 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: hitzer 354
Coal Size/Type: anthracite nut
Location: scpa. bedford co. buffalo mills

Post Fri. Dec. 13, 2013 9:46 am

welcome and good job u learn fast...and u displayed the patience needed for coal burning...it ain't wood...sounds like ur good to go,,,B.B.

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Scottaw
Member
Posts: 132
Joined: Tue. Dec. 03, 2013 3:51 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Hitzer
Stove/Furnace Model: 50-93
Location: Spruce Creek, PA

Post Sat. Dec. 14, 2013 5:10 am

So we lost internet for a day, but haven't lost power yet. We're looking at 6-10 inches of snow today so it should be a good test.

Stove is still humming along nicely. Temps are about the same, just a bit higher on the flue. Last night I noticed lots of blue flames, am I supposed to see them with everything closed up? I was thinking those were only supposed to be there with an air door open, but I guess they could be from the thermostat damper opening? Or is that indicative of an air leak? The flames are going around the bottom of the hopper, any concerns there?

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Lightning
Member
Posts: 8304
Joined: Wed. Nov. 16, 2011 9:51 am
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Overmodified/Bored out Clayton 1537
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/Awesome Size
Location: Olean, NY

Post Sat. Dec. 14, 2013 5:48 am

The blue flames are more prominent during ignition of fresh coal while hydrocarbons are being baked out. After that it depends on how fast and hot you are burning. During a low slow burn there is very little or often not any blue flames. Then with a moderate to high faster burn there will be some blue flames

As for the hopper, I'm sure someone can advise. It's important that the fire doesn't make its way into it. It shouldn't if it's properly sealed.

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lsayre
Member
Posts: 12262
Joined: Wed. Nov. 23, 2005 9:17 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: AHS S130 Coal Gun
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Anthracite Pea
Other Heating: Resistance Boiler (13.5 KW)
Location: N/E Ohio, between Medina and Wadsworth

Post Sat. Dec. 14, 2013 6:09 am

Lightning wrote:As for the hopper, I'm sure someone can advise. It's important that the fire doesn't make its way into it. It shouldn't if it's properly sealed.
The only thing I'm aware of that's a total no-no with a hopper is using bituminous (or 'bit') coal. Anthracite only for a hopper.
-Larry

Democracy rests upon the principle that collective wisdom arises from a pool of individual ignorance. A Republic rests squarely upon objective law, and fundamentally upon those laws which restrict the scope and actions of government.

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freetown fred
Member
Posts: 21426
Joined: Thu. Dec. 31, 2009 12:33 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut
Location: Freetown,NY 13803

Post Sat. Dec. 14, 2013 7:02 am

Real nice. Hey scott, put your location in your profile--saves having to try & track it down when you're talking about conditions--I promise--nobody's gonna steal ya :clap: toothy
"A people that values it's privileges above it's principals, soon loses both"--Dwight D Eisenhower

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Freddy
Member
Posts: 6606
Joined: Fri. Apr. 11, 2008 2:54 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 130 (pea)
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Reading piece o' junk in the barn (rice)
Coal Size/Type: Pea size, Superior, deep mined
Location: Orrington, Maine

Post Sat. Dec. 14, 2013 7:33 am

Good lookin' setup. Thanks for sharing!
Orrington, Maine
Fred

"If you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all".

Scottaw
Member
Posts: 132
Joined: Tue. Dec. 03, 2013 3:51 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Hitzer
Stove/Furnace Model: 50-93
Location: Spruce Creek, PA

Post Sat. Dec. 14, 2013 7:53 am

I'll update now, but for those following this thread, I'm in Spruce Creek PA. A quiet little fly fishing town in central PA, near State College.

One of my main reasons for going hand fired is that we are last priority for power outages. The town has an enormous population of 260. And about a 5 minute drive away is an Amish village, I'd imagine there's a few hitzers there.

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Hambden Bob
Member
Posts: 6473
Joined: Mon. Jan. 04, 2010 10:54 am
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman 1998 Magnum Stoker
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Blower Model Coal Chubby 1982-Serial#0097
Coal Size/Type: Rice-A-Roni ! / Nut
Other Heating: Pro-Pain Forced Air
Location: Hambden Twp. Geauga County,Ohio

Post Sat. Dec. 14, 2013 8:08 am

Scottaw,shame on you ! I'm seeing that you've had the audacity to come to this Board,and EXCITE many Good Folks by sharing your Total First Stove Experience,with Pictures to boot ! When an 'Ol Greaser like Freetown Fred gets excited,well,you've accomplished something ! Coal may not be for everyone,but it sure is for you. Thanx again for making our Board a two-way street of Coal Afficienado's ! Mayor,you've snagged another one burnin' 'Da Black Gold ! toothy
Remember,There's No Sight Like Anthracite !......Hambden Bob

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