Cookin' With Coal

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Photog200
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Posts: 2004
Joined: Tue. Feb. 05, 2013 7:11 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & 2 Geneva Oak Andes #517's
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard
Location: Fulton, NY

Post Tue. Feb. 25, 2014 4:19 pm

Sunny Boy wrote:Randy,

Can you "push" the coal from outside the bin rather than shovel from inside ? I use a long-handled steel garden rake. Reaching in through the bin door to push and pull the coal into the bin's four corners whenever I get a delivery of more than three tons.

Maybe a board mounted on the end of a pole, . . . like the push version of the boards they use to pull snow off roofs ?

I know that living in Fulton, you've seen plenty of those being used ! :D

Paul
I bought a longer handled hoe which will help. That is pretty much how I did do it. I am also going to cut down the top of the bin a little so I will be able to get at it better too.

Randy

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Sunny Boy
Member
Posts: 12921
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post Fri. Mar. 14, 2014 12:51 pm

The discussion about cast iron pans got me digging out some of the pans I have.

Found one that I forgot we had.

It's a Wagner Wear 1050. The smallest they made. It came from my girl friend's family. She seemed to remember from her childhood that they were originally sold as ash trays in their family store. I emailed and confirmed that with Dave, The Pan Man.
http://www.panman.com/index.html

Since neither of us smoke, she wanted to keep it for melting butter in as her mother had used it. However, it's so small that the ring of flames of the burners on my gas stove barely heat the outside of it.

But, on the coal stove it works great ! And, it turns out that it's the perfect size for frying an egg in to put on an English muffin.

The other plus is that it cooks a bit slower than the larger pans, so I find I have better control if I want to cook the eggs sunny side up, over easy, or over hard. A regular spatula is too big for this pan, so digging around the kitchen I found that a medium size baking spatula works great.

Without the coal stove I never would have tried this.

Anyone care for an Egg McGlenwood ? :D

Paul
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ddahlgren
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Posts: 1675
Joined: Tue. Feb. 19, 2013 3:30 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404
Location: Mystic CT
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Post Sat. Mar. 15, 2014 8:33 am

Where is the cheese and bacon? 2 must haves!

Sunny Boy
Member
Posts: 12921
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post Sat. Mar. 15, 2014 12:03 pm

ddahlgren wrote:Where is the cheese and bacon? 2 must haves!
Those were just the "proof of concept" trial runs ! Add-ons were scheduled for second trials. :D

No bacon in the house so, this morning I used sliced deli ham.

By the way, those are Jumbo sized eggs I'm using and there's still room in the pan for some add-ons.

Some minced onion sprinkled on top.
Then over easy and add the cheese.
Then with ham on a toasted English muffin.

Second trial pix below.

Third trial - I'll see how well this pan does with a couple of pieces of bacon. Then add the egg over the bacon.

Paul
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SWPaDon
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Posts: 9965
Joined: Sun. Nov. 24, 2013 12:05 pm
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1600M
Coal Size/Type: Bituminous
Other Heating: Oil furnace
Location: Southwest Pa.

Post Sat. Mar. 15, 2014 12:33 pm

Egg McGlenwood. I love it. Thanks for posting the pictures Paul.

dhansen
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Posts: 228
Joined: Mon. Dec. 10, 2012 3:51 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No.6 and No.116
Location: Spruce Head, Maine

Post Sat. Mar. 15, 2014 12:51 pm

Paul knows I suffer from cookstove envy. I have to settle for using my little Wagner 1050 to heat my muffin atop the Glenwood No.116. It fits completely under the finial. Maybe someday I'll have a real cook stove.
wagner1050.jpg

Sunny Boy
Member
Posts: 12921
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post Sat. Mar. 15, 2014 1:03 pm

dhansen wrote:Paul knows I suffer from cookstove envy. I have to settle for using my little Wagner 1050 to heat my muffin atop the Glenwood No.116. It fits completely under the finial. Maybe someday I'll have a real cook stove.
wagner1050.jpg
I love it !

Just buy more small cook ware - it's cheaper then buying a full-sized range. And don't be in a hurry to eat alot. :D

Hey, maybe we can write a diet book and call it the "Glenwood Diet". :roll:

Paul

Sixkids
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Posts: 107
Joined: Sat. Feb. 08, 2014 2:24 pm

Post Fri. Mar. 21, 2014 10:51 am

Hello Everyone! Here is our update on our 1927 Fairmount Wood / Coal cookstove!!
WE FINALLY GOT IT INSTALLED AND RUNNING! :D
ABSOLUTELY no problems getting it to run. Lit the first time and ran beautifully! ABSOLUTELY LOVE this stove!! :D
The guys at Stovehospital in R.I., where we purchased our stove, were totally the go-to people, and also with help and encouragement from the people on this forum!! Thank you one and all! :D
The stove is in, as is the stove pipe, all the way throught the roof!! :D
We are running it on coal with a starter of kindling. Although one of the days we found it easier to run it on wood for that day. We buy coal from an Amish store nearby and have used both Nut coal and then Stove coal when they were out of nut. The bags are 40 lbs each and the brand name is Blaschak, "Saint Nicholas, Mahanoy City, PA" Anthracite Coal. We just bought a skid of the Nut coal. That is 60 bags. We seem to be going through about 3/4 of a bag of nut coal per day and about the same if we use stove coal. We find that if we fill the firebox at night before bed and adjusting the dampers, that it will hold through the night just fine.
We DON'T find that it heats us out of house and home, (our home is 3500 sq. ft), but we are very happy with the heat that it does put out to both cook and bake and also to add heat to our home.
I have been having LOTS of fun cooking on and in our, new-to-us, "REAL" cooking range. I, (as well as my husband, Roger, and son, Justin and daughter, Jenny, have cooked dinners, and have baked chocolate chip cookies and bread in this stove and everything has been wonderful. (Possibly pictures to follow). We currently have another batch of sap cooking away on the stove , making maple syrup. I'm sorry that I didn't get back to your forum to post updates as I had wanted to, but life seems to have a way of getting in the way of life sometimes!
Thanks to you who have be patiently waiting for our update!
Carole

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Vampiro
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Posts: 211
Joined: Tue. Feb. 07, 2012 11:10 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson S260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: #45 BAD HWH
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mk1
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite, Pea Coal
Other Heating: POS gas boiler
Location: Transylvania

Post Fri. Mar. 21, 2014 11:39 pm

I'm very interested in getting a combination coal and gas cook stove. One that is restored of course. I'm looking for information on some of the smaller models, as I do not need that big of a stove. Unless I What are the sizes of the flues for most of the stoves? Is there a risk of CO getting released from the plates where the coal resides under? Could I just use the fire door, and gasket the top plates?

I'm very new to the idea of a coal/gas cook stove. I've have been looking around at the antique stove hospital site and some others that even make brand new stoves with the classic look. The antique stove hospital seems to take them apart, inspect everything, use the best cast iron welding rods they can buy, and so on. Going with a restored stove would even be cheaper than getting a new "old" looking one. Whatever the case, I will be doing more research and finding out as much as I can about these cook stoves. Would be another great addition to the home.

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SWPaDon
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Posts: 9965
Joined: Sun. Nov. 24, 2013 12:05 pm
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1600M
Coal Size/Type: Bituminous
Other Heating: Oil furnace
Location: Southwest Pa.

Post Sat. Mar. 22, 2014 9:07 am

Thanks for the update Sixkids. I was wondering how you were coming along. Glad to hear you are having a good time with your Fairmount cookstove.

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joeq
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Posts: 4072
Joined: Sat. Feb. 11, 2012 11:53 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: G111, Southard Robertson
Stove/Furnace Make: Thermopride
Stove/Furnace Model: oil fired
Location: Northern CT

Post Sat. Mar. 22, 2014 9:20 am

Will you run this stove in the summertime months? Or do you have a modern stove to use?

Sixkids
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Posts: 107
Joined: Sat. Feb. 08, 2014 2:24 pm

Post Sat. Mar. 22, 2014 2:36 pm

COOKING WITH CAROLE!! :)
We have an electric Jenn-Air stove that we COULD use in the summer. Depending on the weather!! :)
I DO enjoy cooking on our 'REAL' stove however! Our Amish friends have told us that just using small sticks in the summer for a fire quick enough to cook your food and then it is gone, cooks your food, but doesn't heat your home as much. We may go with that idea, but we'll see. We have even found ourselves using both stoves at the same time when baking cookies the other night! I also have cooked on our 'REAL' stove while cleaning the top of our Jenn-Air, where we had sap boil over while making maple syrup. Nice to have two stoves.

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dlj
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Posts: 1269
Joined: Thu. Nov. 27, 2008 6:38 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters
Location: Monroe, NY

Post Sat. Mar. 22, 2014 4:17 pm

Sixkids wrote:COOKING WITH CAROLE!! :)
We have an electric Jenn-Air stove that we COULD use in the summer. Depending on the weather!! :)
I DO enjoy cooking on our 'REAL' stove however! Our Amish friends have told us that just using small sticks in the summer for a fire quick enough to cook your food and then it is gone, cooks your food, but doesn't heat your home as much. We may go with that idea, but we'll see. We have even found ourselves using both stoves at the same time when baking cookies the other night! I also have cooked on our 'REAL' stove while cleaning the top of our Jenn-Air, where we had sap boil over while making maple syrup. Nice to have two stoves.
We used poplar wood in the summer - heats the food, but little more...

dj

Sunny Boy
Member
Posts: 12921
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post Tue. Mar. 25, 2014 11:36 am

Welcome back Carole, and congrats on joining the world of coal ! :D

I'll post some of those pictures of what you've been cooking in the Fairmont, but please don't blame me if some of the chow hounds on this forum show up on your door step ! :D

Paul

Sunny Boy
Member
Posts: 12921
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post Tue. Mar. 25, 2014 11:50 am

I found another use for my coal range that I can't do as well with my modern stove, or as inexpensively.

Cooking dirt !

That's right, dirt - or more accurately, soil.

As any gardener knows the best way to get rid of lil' critters in potting soil is to bake it. Only problem is filling up the kitchen with the smell of baking dirt. Not such a nice smell, . . . unless your a grave digger. :D

Anyway, my Glenwood Sunny has vent holes in the back of the oven that lead into the flue just before it exits the stove to the stove pipe. Those holes keep a negative pressure in the oven to send cooking odors and excess moisture up the chimney.

Up until now I thought that wasn't good. I miss having the kitchen fill up with the smells of good baking. I figured, that when the day comes to rebuild the range, I'd make an on/off cover for those holes.

Well, cooking dirt turns out to be one of those times I'm glad Glenwood thought to put those vents in there. No need to fire up the modern oven (pro-pain at over $4.00 a gallon), or run an electric exhaust fan.

Like a base heater, because the range heats best in indirect mode, that means that the oven is always on, except during reloading. So, I can put pans of compost in the oven to bake the bugs dead and all at no additional cost of gas or electric.

Maybe as soon as the ground thaws, I may make a mud pie. Haven't made one of those since I was six years old! :D

Paul
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