Cookin' With Coal

 
ReidH
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Posts: 13
Joined: Sat. Dec. 14, 2019 2:12 pm
Location: Ontario, Canada
Hand Fed Coal Stove: AGA 47/10 Cooker

Post by ReidH » Mon. Jan. 27, 2020 8:59 pm

Hello All,

A few more pica of the Aga. The top with the covers closed and open.

Reid

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Hoytman
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Posts: 1897
Joined: Wed. Jan. 18, 2017 11:30 pm
Location: swOH near a little town where the homes are mobile and the cars aren’t
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 354
Coal Size/Type: nut coal
Other Heating: electric, wood, oil

Post by Hoytman » Mon. Jan. 27, 2020 9:07 pm

That’s interesting...

 
ReidH
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Posts: 13
Joined: Sat. Dec. 14, 2019 2:12 pm
Location: Ontario, Canada
Hand Fed Coal Stove: AGA 47/10 Cooker

Post by ReidH » Mon. Jan. 27, 2020 9:52 pm

The grate and carrier that can be removed through the ashpit
Reid

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CapeCoaler
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Posts: 6230
Joined: Sun. Feb. 10, 2008 3:48 pm
Location: Cape Cod, MA
Stoker Coal Boiler: want AA130
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine BS#4, Harman MKII, Hitzer 503,...
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Stove

Post by CapeCoaler » Mon. Jan. 27, 2020 10:22 pm

you will love the AGA...

 
ReidH
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Posts: 13
Joined: Sat. Dec. 14, 2019 2:12 pm
Location: Ontario, Canada
Hand Fed Coal Stove: AGA 47/10 Cooker

Post by ReidH » Tue. Jan. 28, 2020 8:18 pm

CapeCoaler wrote:
Mon. Jan. 27, 2020 10:22 pm
you will love the AGA...
I am looking forward to getting the AGA into the kitchen. I need to install a chimney, do a few minor fixes on the stove and install a beam in the cellar to support the weight of the stove.
The weight is significant as an assembled unit. Disassembly may be the best solution to get it installed without injuring the house or myself.
Disassembly requires the removal of the kieselguhr (diatomaceous earth). From what I have read, this is a dusty, messy task. Probably a good outdoors task.

Reid

 
CapeCoaler
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Posts: 6230
Joined: Sun. Feb. 10, 2008 3:48 pm
Location: Cape Cod, MA
Stoker Coal Boiler: want AA130
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine BS#4, Harman MKII, Hitzer 503,...
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Stove

Post by CapeCoaler » Tue. Jan. 28, 2020 9:39 pm

Levers, couple of safe jacks and 3 sheets of 3/4" plywood...
Move her in one piece...

 
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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 20502
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Location: Central NY
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Post by Sunny Boy » Wed. Jan. 29, 2020 9:00 am

Thanks Reid. The AGA's have been mentioned in this and other threads. And I have seen some You Tube videos about them, but never with this much detail about them. A very unique way to accomplish basically the same things as ranges on this side of the pond.

I don't see mention of it in the AGA literature. What , and where, is the "diatomaceous earth", and what is it's purpose ?

Paul

 
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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 20502
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Location: Central NY
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Post by Sunny Boy » Wed. Jan. 29, 2020 9:05 am

CapeCoaler wrote:
Tue. Jan. 28, 2020 9:39 pm
Levers, couple of safe jacks and 3 sheets of 3/4" plywood...
Move her in one piece...
Or cheap way is with pipe rollers. Tap the ends with a hammer to angle the pipes to turn them to steer the stove where you want it to go. In boatyards, we used racks of pipe rollers and come-a-longs to move up to 50 ton boats before the days of travel lifts. ;)

Paul

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Hoytman
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Posts: 1897
Joined: Wed. Jan. 18, 2017 11:30 pm
Location: swOH near a little town where the homes are mobile and the cars aren’t
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 354
Coal Size/Type: nut coal
Other Heating: electric, wood, oil

Post by Hoytman » Wed. Jan. 29, 2020 10:51 am

My stove temps under the damper rod are liking that 320-335 range...this puts the stove top about 175-185. I haven't tried to cook off of it yet, but was wondering what some of you thought about cooking at those temps...175-185. I have no idea how hot some of you need your cook tops to be. I just know that I can't even boil water at the temperature I am running now and the room is 74-76 with outside air temps 15-30 degrees.

This is for two reasons...
1. My stove is so big I have to run it at a low temperature to maintain the house temps.
2. My stove is not a radiant stove, but is a blower model, which likely shields the stove top from some of the heat.

 
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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 20502
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Location: Central NY
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Post by Sunny Boy » Wed. Jan. 29, 2020 11:04 am

Hoytman wrote:
Wed. Jan. 29, 2020 10:51 am
My stove temps under the damper rod are liking that 320-335 range...this puts the stove top about 175-185. I haven't tried to cook off of it yet, but was wondering what some of you thought about cooking at those temps...175-185. I have no idea how hot some of you need your cook tops to be. I just know that I can't even boil water at the temperature I am running now and the room is 74-76 with outside air temps 15-30 degrees.

This is for two reasons...
1. My stove is so big I have to run it at a low temperature to maintain the house temps.
2. My stove is not a radiant stove, but is a blower model, which likely shields the stove top from some of the heat.
Those are slow-cooker/Crock Pot temps. Basically, any recipe you'd cook in a Crock Pot you could do in a Dutch Oven on your stove top at those temps. And it would take about the same length of time as most slow-cooker/Crock Pot recipes.

Using my IR gun to measure the range temps that work for my cooktop cooking I use at least 500 F. To keep a rolling boil in a two qt. sauce pan, about 600F. To fry foods, or boil water in a large stock pot, about 700F works.

Paul

 
Hoytman
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Posts: 1897
Joined: Wed. Jan. 18, 2017 11:30 pm
Location: swOH near a little town where the homes are mobile and the cars aren’t
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 354
Coal Size/Type: nut coal
Other Heating: electric, wood, oil

Post by Hoytman » Wed. Jan. 29, 2020 11:19 am

Thanks, Paul. That's sort of what I was thinking after using my IR gun on an iron skillet frying eggs. Sort of disappointing, but I suppose it's give and take like everything else. A radiant stove of the same size would help only slightly, but a smaller radiant stove that I'd have to burn at a hotter temperature would likely help the most. All this leads me to my next question or thought...

I'm not so sure in my 1300sq.ft. home (1954), and my hearth space which is 42" deep and 7' wide, that I could find a cook stove small enough that I could run it at the temps you mentioned without drastically over-heating my home. I do have a large garage (approx. 30'x36') I could use it in and heat. Insurance company might frown on it, but I don't have to park any cars in there, and I plan on using it for a shop anyway. (That's my way of getting a cook stove and justifying it. LOL!)

 
corey
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Location: Southwest VA
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Buck Stove Hybrid
Coal Size/Type: Eastern KY bituminous

Post by corey » Wed. Jan. 29, 2020 11:29 am

Hoytman wrote:
Wed. Jan. 29, 2020 10:51 am
My stove temps under the damper rod are liking that 320-335 range...this puts the stove top about 175-185. I haven't tried to cook off of it yet, but was wondering what some of you thought about cooking at those temps...175-185. I have no idea how hot some of you need your cook tops to be. I just know that I can't even boil water at the temperature I am running now and the room is 74-76 with outside air temps 15-30 degrees.

This is for two reasons...
1. My stove is so big I have to run it at a low temperature to maintain the house temps.
2. My stove is not a radiant stove, but is a blower model, which likely shields the stove top from some of the heat.
My stove has internal baffles plus when blower is going its blower right across top.

I have made some tasty beans not attempted fried foods.

 
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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 20502
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Location: Central NY
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Post by Sunny Boy » Wed. Jan. 29, 2020 12:08 pm

Hoytman wrote:
Wed. Jan. 29, 2020 11:19 am
Thanks, Paul. That's sort of what I was thinking after using my IR gun on an iron skillet frying eggs. Sort of disappointing, but I suppose it's give and take like everything else. A radiant stove of the same size would help only slightly, but a smaller radiant stove that I'd have to burn at a hotter temperature would likely help the most. All this leads me to my next question or thought...

I'm not so sure in my 1300sq.ft. home (1954), and my hearth space which is 42" deep and 7' wide, that I could find a cook stove small enough that I could run it at the temps you mentioned without drastically over-heating my home. I do have a large garage (approx. 30'x36') I could use it in and heat. Insurance company might frown on it, but I don't have to park any cars in there, and I plan on using it for a shop anyway. (That's my way of getting a cook stove and justifying it. LOL!)
That size hearth is about the same size area of slates I have my Sunny Glenwood on. With an 18 inch wide oven, it's one of the smallest of GW models, but it's longer than many larger ranges because of the optional water reservoir tank on the end. And the bigger models with a reservoir are only a couple of inches longer. The main change in width is the oven width. So a Model C with a 20 inch oven and water res, is only about 2 inches wider. The biggest models with 22 inch ovens add about 4 - 5 inches width. BTW, we cook 20 pound turkeys in a large roasting pan and have no trouble fitting it in the 18 inch wide oven of this Sunny Glenwood 203.

Many antique ranges were never mounted on a hearth. They sat right on wood floors. There's enough height under the range that wood floors don't get hot enough to discolor.

The firebox design of ranges allow them to change cooktop temps more quickly than a deep firebed heating stove. And, you only need to run it hotter when cooking. You can turn down the dampers when just using it for heating.

By flipping the oven damper to direct draft mode, and opening the primary damper more, the fire revs up heat for the two round covers over the firebox, but doesn't send much heat to the rest of the stove. The hot exhaust goes to the stove's exit collar near the end of the firebox and up the stove pipe. So you quickly get two very hot "burners" while not over heating the rest of the stove to do that. When done cooking, reset the dampers to heating mode and within a few minutes your back to just heating level of output.

And in indirect draft "heating mode" my little Sunny Glenwood has longer flues and more heat extracting surface area than large base heaters, base burners, suspended pot stoves, or backpipe Oaks. :yes:

Plus, like mine, with the water reservoir, I can close off the dampers to the flues for the reservoir tank and that's about 4 sq ft of heat radiating surface area that then becomes a heat shield instead. Then more heat goes to the chimney to maintain a draft, thus allowing you to use smaller damper openings for lower cooktop temps.

Think of a range with it's many dampers and flue paths as a variable sized heating stove that you can adjust to your needs with the flip of a damper, rather than adding or removing bricks to change size of a firebed. ;)

Paul

 
Hoytman
New Member
Posts: 1897
Joined: Wed. Jan. 18, 2017 11:30 pm
Location: swOH near a little town where the homes are mobile and the cars aren’t
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 354
Coal Size/Type: nut coal
Other Heating: electric, wood, oil

Post by Hoytman » Wed. Jan. 29, 2020 1:19 pm

Can you provide some pictures, Paul? Seems like a few pages back you may posted at least one picture, maybe more, but my memory fails me on how many, if any, and which stoves you are referring to. Thank you!!

 
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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 20502
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Location: Central NY
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Post by Sunny Boy » Wed. Jan. 29, 2020 2:51 pm

Hoytman wrote:
Wed. Jan. 29, 2020 1:19 pm
Can you provide some pictures, Paul? Seems like a few pages back you may posted at least one picture, maybe more, but my memory fails me on how many, if any, and which stoves you are referring to. Thank you!!
If you read the first page of this thread, it explains more about how ranges work, with pictures of my range showing what the damper controls are and do.

There's six dampers for my range setup, because of the water reservoir. Most ranges only have five. However, I only need to use four with coal for all my cooking/baking needs. And three dampers when just using it as a heating stove.

The following few pages after number one give even more explanation of uses and pix of other makes of ranges.

And, unlike most heating stoves, a coal range will burn wood very well. But a wood range should not be used for coal.

Here's a recent picture of my 1903 Sunny Glenwood 203 range.

Paul

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