Cookin' With Coal

 
ReidH
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Location: Ontario, Canada
Hand Fed Coal Stove: AGA 47/10 Cooker, Heartland Oval Cookstove

Post by ReidH » Fri. Mar. 19, 2021 1:15 pm

Sunny Boy wrote:
Fri. Mar. 19, 2021 11:10 am


I have a Wagner cast iron griddle that is more rectangular, but fits nicely over the firebox area of the cooktop and that is the pancake griddle now. Doesn't add a bad aluminum taste to food, less likely for food to stick to, and it's a lot easier to clean than aluminum. ;)

Paul
Yes, I can do without the aluminum pots and pans. Had enough meals cooked on those things when I was a kid.

These old gate marked cast iron griddles were made in different sizes to allow use with different sized stove covers. You may also notice that have thin extensions along the sides so that cover openings made by the flat edges of the "I"s would leave a gap. See pic below of pan slid out of position on the stove top

Nice thing about these griddles is they are fairly inexpensive as they really aren't very good for modern flat surfaced stoves.
I have to clean this one and season it.

BTW the bacon and egg pan works perfectly. All food particles are easily removed with a non abrasive scrubber. All seasoning methods I tested have the same effectiveness.

Reid

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Sunny Boy
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Location: Central NY
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Post by Sunny Boy » Sat. Mar. 20, 2021 1:50 pm

Yes, I seen some of those various sized oblong griddles on eBay that set down into the cooktop over the firebox. I can see where they'd be handy when you need a large, hotter cooking surface than a cast iron griddle sitting on the cooktop. Of if your just running a small, quick fire in the shoulder months and don't want to heat the kitchen, but still want a hot surface for say, pancakes or grilled cheese sandwiches.

We're more likely to do BBQ type grilling than griddle frying. I like the recast ones that Dana is selling that have the openings to allow grease to drip into the firebed and also openings along the sides to have the stove draft draw some of the grilling smoke up the chimney. I don't have a kitchen exhaust fan and prefer not to have the smoke alarms complain about my grilling. :D

I've tried grilling in through the broiler door (secondary air damper door) and it was OK. All the drippings fed the fire and not one bit of grilling smoke escaped the stove. But, having the food that close to the top of the firebed made it tough to judge when the food is cooked and when it's turning to carbon. :oops: I had to let the firebed level get lower than normal to prevent instant cremation of the hot dogs I was trying to grill. :o

With the grills like Dana's, the food sits about an inch higher over the firebed. Doesn't sound like much but it does make a noticeable difference that the food is less likely to burn. Plus it's easier to see how well it's cooking. ;)

Paul

 
ReidH
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Posts: 117
Joined: Sat. Dec. 14, 2019 2:12 pm
Location: Ontario, Canada
Hand Fed Coal Stove: AGA 47/10 Cooker, Heartland Oval Cookstove

Post by ReidH » Sat. Mar. 20, 2021 3:08 pm

Sunny Boy wrote:
Sat. Mar. 20, 2021 1:50 pm

We're more likely to do BBQ type grilling than griddle frying. I like the recast ones that Dana is selling that have the openings to allow grease to drip into the firebed and also openings along the sides to have the stove draft draw some of the grilling smoke up the chimney. I don't have a kitchen exhaust fan and prefer not to have the smoke alarms complain about my grilling. :D

Paul
Yes, I have seen a pic in this post of the grill Dana is selling. Great for grilling and barbecuing inside when it is too wet or cold. I want to pick up one.
Again there is probably sizing to consider. I require a grill that is 21 inches by 19.25 inches minimum or it will topple into the fire.
I am assuming Dana's is a #8 based on the picture on his web site and the 8 inch cover tending to the the most popular cover size for New England made ranges.

There is one of these grills being sold together with an oblong griddle on ebay. (seller calls it a fish fryer. Maybe that is the correct terminology). With quoted dimensions of 17 inch by 8 inch. Too small for my cookstove with 9.5 inch covers
Suspect the example on ebay is for a small cookstove and the griddle is probably a #7.
The griddle I purchased appears to be marked 9 or 9.5 on the bottom and has a overall length of 24 inches long including the handles and 22 inches excluding the handles.

Reid

 
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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 21860
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Location: Central NY
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Post by Sunny Boy » Sat. Mar. 20, 2021 4:35 pm

Saw that combo griddles listing. They are too small for my Glenwood 208 with "8 inch" round covers,... that actually measure 8-1/2 inch diameter, and the cooktop "holes" it would have to fit down into are about 7-3/4 inch. Likely meant for a range with 7 inch covers ????

There is also a griddle on eBay that has #7 cast into - similar to the #8 - which is about the same too-small size for my range.

My range and other Glenwood ranges could be ordered with 7 inch covers, or 9 inch, but 8 is the most commonly seen. However, not all the later 8 inch round covers will fit my 1903 Glenwood. So the number 8 can be misleading. I've seen many of them in 8 inch, 8-1/8 and 8-1/4 actual diameter. To find a ring plate to replace my cracked original outer ring we searched through hundreds of round covers at Wilson's, including all those paving his driveway. Only found the one that will fit my 1903.

There are some griddles that, looking at their shape and the sizes listed, I don't think are meant to sit down in place of the round covers and "I" plate over the firebox to get direct heat. I think that like the water boiler/canning tanks they are just meant to just sit on and cover that hottest end of the cooktop.

Paul

 
ReidH
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Posts: 117
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Location: Ontario, Canada
Hand Fed Coal Stove: AGA 47/10 Cooker, Heartland Oval Cookstove

Post by ReidH » Sat. Mar. 20, 2021 5:51 pm

Yeah, I believe the combo sale grill and griddle are for 7 inch covers. Bidding is high. I guess if you need those for a 7" cover stove, you will pay. That or the collectors are raising the price...

I did see a excellent shape #8 oblong griddle, same make/style as the one i purchased on "Make offer".

With regards to covers, it is also the thickness that is important. The covers on the Heartland range are nominally the same diameter as those used on the Stewart cookstove. The Stewart requires covers twice the thickness compared to the Heartland.

Reid

 
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mntbugy
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: D S 1500, Warm Moring 400
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Coal Size/Type: stove and nut and some bit
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Post by mntbugy » Sun. Apr. 18, 2021 7:50 am

Nice little range, if somebody wants it.
Bring some helpers, it's heavy. :o

https://williamsport.craigslist.org/atq/d/cross-f ... 31286.html

 
ReidH
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Posts: 117
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Location: Ontario, Canada
Hand Fed Coal Stove: AGA 47/10 Cooker, Heartland Oval Cookstove

Post by ReidH » Thu. May. 13, 2021 1:32 pm

Hello All,

The chimney for the Heartland Oval was finally installed last week. Been burning old punky house timbers for the past few days to drive the moisture out of the new firebricks, test out the Stirling fan, cook lunch and last Sunday's dinner. Saturday, I pick up 20 bags of Blaschak and will try that in the warm 20 degree C temps forecast this weekend.

Reid

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Sunny Boy
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Location: Central NY
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Post by Sunny Boy » Thu. May. 13, 2021 3:50 pm

Congrats on getting it going ! Next step is to cook on it with a coal fire. :yes:

Coal in a range during warm weather is a good test of the stove and chimney system. Once the chimney warms up, if it'll maintain a draft with a slow coal fire, it'll be easy to control when the weather gets cooler. ;)

Paul

 
ReidH
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Posts: 117
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Location: Ontario, Canada
Hand Fed Coal Stove: AGA 47/10 Cooker, Heartland Oval Cookstove

Post by ReidH » Thu. May. 13, 2021 6:53 pm

Yup, planning on roasting a chicken Sunday.

Oh yah the warm temps will be a test of the chimney draft and me. :)

Hooked up the manometer today, so all ready for testing Saturday when I return with the coal.

Reid

 
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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 21860
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Location: Central NY
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Post by Sunny Boy » Fri. May. 14, 2021 11:35 am

With warmer weather, you'll have to run it with the primary and MPD open a bit more (and no secondary air) than you would when cooler weather causes a stronger draft.

When in oven mode (indirect draft) ranges, with their longer flues and greater surface area, extract more heat from the flue gases than heating stoves can before the exhaust reaches the chimney collar. So, in warmer weather you need to open the dampers enough to send a bit more heat to the chimney to keep the draft going.

If the kitchen gets too warm, but you want the range to keep running, try putting it in direct draft, close the MPD fully, and just a sliver of opening for the primary damper. The reduces the flue length and thus how much heat extracting surface area is being heated. When you do that, your best cooking temps will be confined to the left end of the cooktop - the area directly over the firebox. The right end of the cooktop, and the oven, won't be hot enough to do more than just keep food warm.

Don't be afraid to experiment with damper openings. It's the only way your system can teach you what it likes. ;)

Paul

 
ReidH
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: AGA 47/10 Cooker, Heartland Oval Cookstove

Post by ReidH » Fri. May. 14, 2021 5:45 pm

Paul,

Thanks for your advice. I will need all I can get tomorrow. It's 70 degrees today and will be the same tomorrow.
I'm sure I will have the windows and sliding door wide open in the kitchen to keep the temps in the house reasonable.

I figure I can experiment for a week or so before the humid air takes over.

So far with wood today
- the MPD does a decent job of adjusting draft.
- switching to indirect (oven) mode increases the draft reading by 0.01" of water.

More interesting data to follow tomorrow.

Reid

 
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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 21860
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Location: Central NY
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Post by Sunny Boy » Fri. May. 14, 2021 7:29 pm

Well, that's different! :o

Switching to indirect draft should lower the mano reading because of the increased resistance to exhaust flow of the longer flue pathway, combined with the range extracting more heat from the exhaust into the oven and lower portions of the range.

Switching to direct draft sends more of that heat "directly" to the chimney, thus causing stronger draft. Same happens with base heaters.

Are you sure the oven damper is not working backwards ? :eh:

Paul

 
ReidH
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Joined: Sat. Dec. 14, 2019 2:12 pm
Location: Ontario, Canada
Hand Fed Coal Stove: AGA 47/10 Cooker, Heartland Oval Cookstove

Post by ReidH » Sat. May. 15, 2021 12:42 am

The oven damper was functioning as expected. The range was started from cold and the oven damper then slid into place to block the direct flue when the left side of the cook top was over 450 degrees. The oven slide damper is located on the top centre back above the oven. With the direct flue blocked by the damper, all flue gases must travel around the oven, around a baffle and out the bottom back flue below the oven which is ~20 inches below the direct flue outlet. A picture is worth a thousand words so I need to find a decent pic or drawing of the flue arrangement of a Findlay/Elmira/Heartland Oval

I will be able to test further with coal tomorrow.

Reid

 
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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 21860
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Location: Central NY
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Post by Sunny Boy » Sat. May. 15, 2021 11:46 am

I'm curious to see if it repeats the higher mano reading in indirect draft.

One thought. If your using a Dwyer Mark II mano, do you have the tube connected to the right or the left port ?

Paul

 
ReidH
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: AGA 47/10 Cooker, Heartland Oval Cookstove

Post by ReidH » Sat. May. 15, 2021 1:52 pm

I am using a -0.05 - 0 - +0.20 magnehelic manometer. It is plumbed to read on the positive side of the scale.
It is zero or thereabouts with no fire. When I fired up with wood and tested , the draft crept up to 0.04. Switching from direct to indirect changed that value to 0.05.

Just finished my Christmas shopping today. 20 bags of black shiny rocks.

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