Do You Need to Season a New/Restored Stove.

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DePippo79
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Posts: 731
Joined: Tue. Mar. 05, 2013 3:17 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Oak 40, Stanley Argand No. 30, Glenwood Modern Oak 114, Stanley Argand No. 20 missing parts.
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite. Stove and nut size.
Other Heating: Oil hot water.
Location: Hampton, NH

Post Sat. Aug. 10, 2013 3:10 am

Hey guys seeing how it's getting close, one more day till I get my stove just wondering if there's a proper way to break in a new or rebuilt stove. Similiar to breaking in a new engine. Such as bringing it up to temp slowly. BTW love the smell of fresh paint heating up. Although my stove is a hundred years old. Probably pretty seasoned already. Thanks for any suggestions. Matt

PS: Did alot of searching the forum and haven't seen this yet. Every time I use the search tool it just brings up the key words. Not the actual thread topics.

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titleist1
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Posts: 4404
Joined: Wed. Nov. 14, 2007 4:06 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman Mag Stoker (old style) one in basement, one in workshop
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III on standby for long power outages
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite; Nut/Anthracite
Location: Cecil County, MD

Post Sat. Aug. 10, 2013 8:07 am

I have seen it mentioned in a few threads over the years to build a couple small fires in new stoves to 'season' them. It also helps in that if you do discover a problem you don't have a large, hot coal fire to figure out how to handle.

In my hand fed's I would build a small wood fire when they were new for the 'smoke off' and also at the beginning of the season just to make sure I had door gaskets correct and no problems with the flue pipe seams.

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freetown fred
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Posts: 21577
Joined: Thu. Dec. 31, 2009 12:33 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut
Location: Freetown,NY 13803

Post Sat. Aug. 10, 2013 8:34 am

Ditto on that--new, refurbished, start of new season, which ever--I always do a nice lil wood fire just cause it seems like the common sense thing to do for all the reasons titleist mentioned above:)

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DePippo79
Member
Posts: 731
Joined: Tue. Mar. 05, 2013 3:17 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Oak 40, Stanley Argand No. 30, Glenwood Modern Oak 114, Stanley Argand No. 20 missing parts.
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite. Stove and nut size.
Other Heating: Oil hot water.
Location: Hampton, NH

Post Sat. Aug. 10, 2013 11:00 am

Thank you. Let you all know how I make out. Matt

JohnB
Member
Posts: 435
Joined: Sat. Jul. 06, 2013 6:06 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Coal Size/Type: Mostly nut, some pea
Location: Northeastern Ct.

Post Sat. Aug. 10, 2013 1:47 pm

With a cast iron stove like the Jotul wood stoves where all the abutting seams are filled with furnace cement you are supposed to build 3 fires to break in/season the new or rebuilt stove. First fire just gets it up to 200*f (stove top) & then goes out, second fire gets it up to 300*f & the 3rd fire takes it up to 400*F. The stove needs to cool completely between each fire.

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