A New Warm Morning

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Kielanders
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Stove/Furnace Make: Harman & Warm Morning
Stove/Furnace Model: TLC-2000, SF-250, WM843
Location: Seward, Alaska

Post Sat. Apr. 06, 2013 11:09 pm

I found a 'new' 1980 Warm Morning 523 (100lb capacity) late last week. It had past from the original purchaser, to the present owner of a farmhouse in the Northeast. The present owner kept it in the living room as a conversation piece. It was never hooked-up, as the previous and present owner heated with wood. I think the original owner was going to try coal 30 years ago, but never got around to it.

I'm really excited, and wanted to thank everyone for their thoughts and advice over the past 18 months - I especially want to thank William, he is a real gift on this site for so many, including myself.

The owner's packing her up now for the long journey here, should probably take about 3 weeks. I feel a little guilty burning in a 30 year old stove that is new. The owner said he really wanted her to go to someone that would use and appreciate her - I said, that I think my wife and I fit that bill nicely.

I'm attaching some photos.

I'd love to hear thoughts and advice.
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photo1.jpg
photo2.JPG
Last edited by Kielanders on Sun. Apr. 07, 2013 1:22 am, edited 1 time in total.

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LDPosse
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Post Sat. Apr. 06, 2013 11:33 pm

Wow! That's amazing to see one of these stoves in brand new condition!!! Awesome find! :up:

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Kielanders
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Stove/Furnace Make: Harman & Warm Morning
Stove/Furnace Model: TLC-2000, SF-250, WM843
Location: Seward, Alaska

Post Sun. Apr. 07, 2013 12:17 am

LDPosse wrote:Wow! That's amazing to see one of these stoves in brand new condition!!! Awesome find! :up:
Thanks LD. From your other thread, did find and oval/round adapter for your 523?
Last edited by Kielanders on Sun. Apr. 07, 2013 1:16 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Short Bus
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Stoker Coal Boiler: Kewanee boiler with Anchor stoker
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Location: Cantwell Alaska

Post Sun. Apr. 07, 2013 12:41 am

I really like this choice in stoves.
I've been looking at the map and need to start planning a trip to Seward with a load of fresh, sized coal from Healy
I've been wanting to see one of these burning Alaska coal, of course then I will just want a warm morning stove.

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Kielanders
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Stove/Furnace Make: Harman & Warm Morning
Stove/Furnace Model: TLC-2000, SF-250, WM843
Location: Seward, Alaska

Post Sun. Apr. 07, 2013 1:15 am

Short Bus wrote:I really like this choice in stoves.
I've been looking at the map and need to start planning a trip to Seward with a load of fresh, sized coal from Healy
I've been wanting to see one of these burning Alaska coal, of course then I will just want a warm morning stove.
Dude, you totally need to PM me when you're coming. I'd love to meet you, we'll do lunch, and have you over to our disaster of a house to see her burn.

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dcrane
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Post Sun. Apr. 07, 2013 6:21 am

out of curiouslty how do all those sq"'s of corner space shake :shock: There is almost as much sq" of non functioning grate as there is functioning grate :eek2:
I bet she burns wood great! but I'd be interested in seeing her burn 100 lbs of coal after the first 100lbs of coal has burned and how you remove the unburned coal that builds in the "dead spots" after time?

Either way they sure sold em' like hotcakes back in the day and they represent a segment of the coal stove market from well prior to the oil crisis but well after the industrial rev. (huge leaps in coal design in 1900 and then more good leaps in coal design in 1979 in modern coal stoves), I think Warm Morning missed both (but thats cetainly in pristine condition... and a great museam peice!).

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michaelanthony
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Post Sun. Apr. 07, 2013 6:59 am

I think you found a beauty and a great stove for what you plan on burning. I also love finding "new" old stuff, makes you feel like no one else has what you got. I think if you are burning bit you are going to be both happy and warm. Hopefully some warm morning guys will chime in!

buck24
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Post Sun. Apr. 07, 2013 11:29 am

dcrane wrote:out of curiouslty how do all those sq"'s of corner space shake :shock: There is almost as much sq" of non functioning grate as there is functioning grate :eek2:
I bet she burns wood great! but I'd be interested in seeing her burn 100 lbs of coal after the first 100lbs of coal has burned and how you remove the unburned coal that builds in the "dead spots" after time?

Either way they sure sold em' like hotcakes back in the day and they represent a segment of the coal stove market from well prior to the oil crisis but well after the industrial rev. (huge leaps in coal design in 1900 and then more good leaps in coal design in 1979 in modern coal stoves), I think Warm Morning missed both (but thats cetainly in pristine condition... and a great museam peice!).
There is no prblem shaking down the 523. The outer portion is the grate ring which holds and supports the round grate. There is a slight angle on it which allows the ash to drop. You could poke from under the grates if you have any type of build up of ash, including the corners. Just have to be careful not to hit the firebricks. I burned a 523 for 29years and never had a problem with it. I wore out the grate ring finally. I hope I could get that type of service out of the Buck Model 24.

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Short Bus
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Location: Cantwell Alaska

Post Sun. Apr. 07, 2013 2:31 pm

I am very optimistic, and have only seen clinkers once in hand firing of Alaska coal, and that day I had a fire that ran like a blast furnace, making hot water for continuous showers and laundry.

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dcrane
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Post Sun. Apr. 07, 2013 2:45 pm

buck24 wrote:
There is no prblem shaking down the 523. The outer portion is the grate ring which holds and supports the round grate. There is a slight angle on it which allows the ash to drop. You could poke from under the grates if you have any type of build up of ash, including the corners. Just have to be careful not to hit the firebricks. I burned a 523 for 29years and never had a problem with it. I wore out the grate ring finally. I hope I could get that type of service out of the Buck Model 24.
That explains it a lil' better for me, I just wondered because looking at how that firebrick is not smooth sided down by the grate (it appears to have ledges or overhangs so to speak which one would think creates dead spots in the coal bed, maybe they are channels which allow prewarmed air to rise and eject up over the coal bed for Bit burning?) and also looking at how the round shaker grate itself acually sits "inside" the firebox area (generally a big "No, No" for this style grate because of heat and clinker jambs), It kinda baffled me :cry: Glad to hear it functions well and either way it sure is pristine looking ;)

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Kielanders
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Location: Seward, Alaska

Post Sun. Apr. 07, 2013 4:25 pm

I've been a tad concerned how the slider grates will work, as opposed to the rocker grates we have now. But, in order to control our burns better, I've pretty much taken to doing clean loads every time; so if I continue that, clinkers, rocks, and bridging isn't as big a concern. It's a pain, but at least with our present stoves, I know exactly how to load it, get it started, and how to control it the entire burn. Hot loads are just puff-back roulette.

Part of the problem we had last season was that our last delivery of 6/8 tons was almost completely dirt, with some gravel coal mixed in. I need to premix/layer every load with twigs every couple of scoops. I've almost burned through it all now, so I'll be more careful next time and inspect the next coal at the yard before I let them load the dump truck and bring it to the house.

Our first two loads a year or so ago were great, softball sized chunks on average. This dirt coal has a tendancy to want to bridge if it's not mixed with twigs. But, the fact with this stove that I can get 100 lb loads in it is a blessing, meaning that even on our cold days, I should be able to get a 24 hour burn. That the ash pan will catch all the ash if I don't let it overflow is another bonus.

I do still feel a little like this stove should be in a museum or something, but we could really use a stove that's a good fit for our coal, something we can afford, and that doesn't need extensive rehab. We certainly seemed to have found it. And the present owner said a couple of times to me, that he really wanted someone to have it that will appreciate and use it.

He has the original paperwork and sales receipt. He sold it to us for what the original sales price was. He charged us a couple hundred extra for building a custom shipping crate for us, and he knows shipping up here costs a bit - so he says he thinks it's fair for everyone.

franco b
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Post Sun. Apr. 07, 2013 6:14 pm

Quite a story, pretty amazing.

You might find that using the draw center of the grate in the new stove to be very helpful, even with regular shaking. Big enough hole to get rid of almost anything.

The idea behind the Warm Morning design is to provide an easy path for flue gas and flame to follow up through the corner chimneys in the fire brick rather than through the bed of coal above. In this way it is felt that the coal bed will slowly turn to coke and burn more cleanly. How well it will work depends on your coal.

The flue outlet is reversible if needed and hopefully you have the shaking tool.

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Kielanders
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Stove/Furnace Make: Harman & Warm Morning
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Location: Seward, Alaska

Post Sun. Apr. 07, 2013 8:04 pm

franco b wrote:Quite a story, pretty amazing.

You might find that using the draw center of the grate in the new stove to be very helpful, even with regular shaking. Big enough hole to get rid of almost anything.

The idea behind the Warm Morning design is to provide an easy path for flue gas and flame to follow up through the corner chimneys in the fire brick rather than through the bed of coal above. In this way it is felt that the coal bed will slowly turn to coke and burn more cleanly. How well it will work depends on your coal.

The flue outlet is reversible if needed and hopefully you have the shaking tool.
Here's a picture of the ashpan and stove paperwork - I'm assuming the shakertool is sitting in the bottom of the ashpan?
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photo3.JPG

franco b
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Post Sun. Apr. 07, 2013 9:59 pm

Yes, that's it. the little bump on the bottom is what lets you pull out on the center grate to open.

Very curious how it will burn for you. Let us know. Be sure to break the stove in a bit with small fire.

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wsherrick
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Post Mon. Apr. 08, 2013 3:01 am

You have done very well. This stove is designed to burn high volatile Bituminous Coal and it will do just that. It will be a vast improvement over what you have been forced to use. I'm glad you managed to get this in such good condition.

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