Why I Like Stove Coal

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DennisH
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Post Sun. Dec. 23, 2012 5:48 am

I burn both nut and stove coal in my Yukon-Eagle Klondike furnace, but the more I use stove coal, the more I think I prefer it over nut. With a good hot bed of embers after shakedown, the stove coal just takes off so much quicker than nut. Better air flow around the larger chunks, I suppose. This morning (0500) I went from shake down to back up at capacity and my preferred flue temp in less than 30 minutes. Now I can forget about feeding the furnace for the next 10-12 hours. My daughter, who feeds the beast when I'm not around, prefers nut. Easier to scoop with smaller chunks perhaps. Either way it's all good, but those big, black diamonds are fun to heap on the fire! :D

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Richard S.
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Post Sun. Dec. 23, 2012 5:56 am

DennisH wrote: My daughter, who feeds the beast when I'm not around, prefers nut. Easier to scoop with smaller chunks perhaps.
Tell her to try shoveling a few tons of it, I used to hate that *censored*. It was like trying to shovel bricks. I'd get to the point I'd have the shovel at the end of chute and have my Uncle send a shovelful down at a time to fill it.

Guess that was better than his predicament when he was the one doing the shoveling as a young man... Egg coal... said he sit in the bin and build walls with it. :lol:

Boots
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Post Sun. Dec. 23, 2012 7:56 am

Ive kicked the idea of burning some stove coal around a bit. I was just concerned that my load would not last as long. I burn nut right now, and its on the larger end of the spectrum. and I like it that way.

NoSmoke
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Post Sun. Dec. 23, 2012 8:15 am

I have always preferred to burning stove coal, but around me there is only one place that sells it and I seldom am in that area. That leaves me with Nut Coal, but I am not a huge fan of it. In fact, in all my stoves, I have found going up one size has always helped; nut coal instead of pea coal in my Surdiac, stove coal in my Vogelzang, and most wood stoves can tolerate burning Stove Coal pretty well too...even those that are not designed for coal. (I know, I know...that is bad, but I ran with scissors in kindergarten too).

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SteveZee
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Post Sun. Dec. 23, 2012 8:42 am

I like it too. I have bulk deliveries for my two old Glenwoods. The kitchen range likes nut (if it's true nut) but tolerates stove and the MO116 like stove but will burn longer on a load of nut. So I custom mixed my 6 ton load this year with 4 tons stove and 2 tons nut. Working out great. When the delivery was made, we dumped half the stove, then the 2 tons of nut and the then the other 2 of stove. I can shovel from the sides for all stove, middle for all nut and a mix from any other place. 8-)

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joeq
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Post Sun. Dec. 23, 2012 10:00 am

I have found going up one size has always helped; nut coal instead of pea coal in my Surdiac,

Mr. Smokeless, quick question on your Surdiac, if you don't mind. This was recomended to me last year, (or at least mix it with pea), which is what I tried. I woke up the following morning, and the nut coal, being so big, clogged the mouth of my hopper, not allowing the coals to feed the bed. Did you ever encounter this problem? My stove is a 513. Was your Surdiac designed with a larger hopper?.

NoSmoke
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Post Sun. Dec. 23, 2012 2:23 pm

I know what thread you are talking about, and checking out the style of your Surdiac versus mine, it is clearly different that mine was much different than yours. I would tell you the model number I had, but I tossed it out years ago, and finished it off in June when I bulldozed my old stove graveyard.

I was not fibbing; mine could take nut coal just fine without jamming, but I am sure your model cannot do so. Too bad, but still excellent stoves. Wish I had not drove over it with the dozer a dozen times.

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joeq
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Post Sun. Dec. 23, 2012 2:39 pm

Too bad, but still excellent stoves. Wish I had not drove over it with the dozer a dozen times.[/quote]

LOL! I've had many circumstances I felt like doing that. "cept most my encounters were working on cars and/or my house. And I've always regretted my juvenile actions the next day. Fortunately I've never owned a dozer. If so, I probably wouldn't have a house or garage to return to. :oops:

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NoSmoke
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Post Sun. Dec. 23, 2012 4:09 pm

I saw one on Craiglist for $150 in MA and darn near drove down there to buy it; that is how much I loved that Surdiac.

I did not drive over it because I was mad at it though. It rotted out the back part of it and so I bought a different stove. I put it out in an old dump I had not realizing I probably could have salvaged it. I dozed that dump a few times, but this June I cleared 10 acres of forest into field, and that dump is in now in the center of the field. Of course, 10 feet below ground level! :-)

I really wished I had that stove back. During the ice storm of 1998 here in Maine we kept warm by it, and ate off it for the 14 days we were without power. I actually got 14 hours of burn time out of it during one of those days. Nice, nice design and I have never seen anyone else mimic their design. Not sure why. Long burn times, simple, no electricity and amazing heat, though I guess that is just heating with coal in general!

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Post Sun. Dec. 23, 2012 4:16 pm

DennisH wrote:I burn both nut and stove coal in my Yukon-Eagle Klondike furnace, but the more I use stove coal, the more I think I prefer it over nut. With a good hot bed of embers after shakedown, the stove coal just takes off so much quicker than nut. Better air flow around the larger chunks, I suppose. This morning (0500) I went from shake down to back up at capacity and my preferred flue temp in less than 30 minutes. Now I can forget about feeding the furnace for the next 10-12 hours. My daughter, who feeds the beast when I'm not around, prefers nut. Easier to scoop with smaller chunks perhaps. Either way it's all good, but those big, black diamonds are fun to heap on the fire! :D
Dennis, I started with 1 ton nut last yr. and bought 1 ton stove last january and I was pleasantly surprised at the same reactions you found, my only adjustment is, I shake and load 3 times in 24 hr. I get excellent response and heat like you sometimes 15 minutes and off and running without the big swing in temps on the stove.

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Rob R.
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Post Sun. Dec. 23, 2012 4:16 pm

I've never burned stove coal, but I do burn bigger coal that recommended in my EFM. :yes:

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SteveZee
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Post Sun. Dec. 23, 2012 8:05 pm

Rob R. wrote:I've never burned stove coal, but I do burn bigger coal that recommended in my EFM. :yes:
Rob, Do you have to adjust for that by slowing the feed or?

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Rob R.
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Post Sun. Dec. 23, 2012 8:32 pm

SteveZee wrote:
Rob R. wrote:I've never burned stove coal, but I do burn bigger coal that recommended in my EFM. :yes:
Rob, Do you have to adjust for that by slowing the feed or?
I am burning buckwheat size coal (only one size larger than normal), and yes...it required an air adjustment. Just like you guys have observed in the hand-fed equipment, air comes up through the larger pieces of coal easier. Without touching the feed I had to reduce the air setting to maintain a proper fire in the stoker. The catch is...even though I didn't adjust the feed, it is still slightly reduced. Because of the size of the coal compared to the space between the auger shaft and between the flights, buck size actually feeds slower than rice at a given setting. 4 teeth of feed with rice spec's at 10 lbs per hour of run time, but only 8 lbs per hour for buck. Right now I am heating my house and making lots of domestic hot water with the feed set at 8 lbs per hour of run time, that is the lowest setting I have ever used in this house. I attribute the reduced input to high quality coal and more efficient burn (less combustion air, lower stack temperature).

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