A Sunny Side ?

Modern and vintage hand fired coal stove are similar to a wood stove and in some cases can burn either. They need to be regulated and fed by hand usually every 12 to 24 hours depending on your usage. They require no power to operate making them ideal for rural settings with long power outages.
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nortcan
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Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
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Post Mon. May. 07, 2012 11:09 am

wsherrick wrote:
nortcan wrote: Thanks buck24.
I saw many Windsor inserts and it was simple to see how they were working but this one is a little different and I will see when the stove will be inside of the home.
They sit right on the floor tiles and are very low, so the tile base should be rised to get an easier access to the ash pan and shaker handle.
Anyway help is always here on the forum and I always appreciate the comments and suggestions. Very often an idea brings an other one.
It is a common misnomer to call these, "Windsor Stoves." It is the arched style of the frame that makes it Windsor. Windsor was a paticular style of design from the mid victorian era. There is also a Windsor style from the 18th Century, however; it is different than the Victorian style of the same name. The most common item in this style is the spindle chairs with a round top. You have, "Windsor," chairs, sofas and tables. You can have, "Windsor," style windows and doors in the house.
The true name for these kinds of stoves is, "Latrobe." It is a Latrobe Stove, named after the man who invented and patented the first one. He was one of the famous Baltimore Latrobes who were Architects under Jefferson. They were instrumental in re building the Capital after the British burned it down in the War Of 1812. The Latrobes were involved in many other big projects like building the B&O Railroad and putting in water and sewer systems in Baltimore and other East Coast Cities.
So you have a Latrobe Heater or the common name for it is a, "Baltimore Heater," since Latrobe lived in Baltimore and sold many of these stoves there.
Good informations, William, thanks

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nortcan
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Post Mon. May. 07, 2012 11:25 am

Greg, yes these heaters are some more complicate but in realty it's about like a base burner without the base and legs. When the direct draft damper is closed the gasses are directed to a pipe at the back going down to the rear base, that base is like a horse shoe around the back of the stove (the 2 side front lower doors are clean out doors). Then the gasses go up in a second pipe to the exit connector. I will send photos showing what I try to explain here.
A curious thing about it is the flue connector being only 4"? Is it to reduce the draft cause the stove is not air tight and the company wanted to compensate for these leaks ( again like on the Bride, many doors, micas...?
The grate is new, the fire pot is a 16" one and I will see if I can make a liner to protect it. The fire pot seems to be fix in the stove so making a liner will be more complicated and the chute is also fix and in the way to work on the fire pot..

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LsFarm
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Post Mon. May. 07, 2012 2:38 pm

Hi Pierre, yes, if the firepot and magazine are fixed, that will be a job to make a liner. Maybe the magazine comes out with just a few screws/bolts??

Take the doors off, then if the magaizine is out, you'd have pretty good access to the firepot.. Hmm... 16" wow that's a heater !!

Interesting design, to have the 'base heated' sections on either side of the ashpan.. I was wondering if those extra doors on the side of the
base were cleanouts or not..

I'd say that the smaller flue would just require lots of draft,, since if the stove is leaky, then the CO could leak out unless there is a strong draft pulling on the stove's inside , trying to pull all the exhaust out.. I hope your chimney has a strong draft.

Does that rear panel with the rectangular slots in the lower part come off easily?? That panel must duct cold air from the floor of the fireplact through the back, and out the top of the stove somewhere??

Greg L
Burning Pea/Buckwheat through an antique stoker [semi retired SSboiler],
Running an Axeman-Anderson 260M boiler burning Pea, About 150-250#per day
Farming, Fixing, Fabricating and Flying: 'spare time' what's that?

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wsherrick
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size
Location: High In The Poconos

Post Mon. May. 07, 2012 4:27 pm

LsFarm wrote:Hi Pierre, yes, if the firepot and magazine are fixed, that will be a job to make a liner. Maybe the magazine comes out with just a few screws/bolts??

Take the doors off, then if the magaizine is out, you'd have pretty good access to the firepot.. Hmm... 16" wow that's a heater !!

Interesting design, to have the 'base heated' sections on either side of the ashpan.. I was wondering if those extra doors on the side of the
base were cleanouts or not..

I'd say that the smaller flue would just require lots of draft,, since if the stove is leaky, then the CO could leak out unless there is a strong draft pulling on the stove's inside , trying to pull all the exhaust out.. I hope your chimney has a strong draft.

Does that rear panel with the rectangular slots in the lower part come off easily?? That panel must duct cold air from the floor of the fireplact through the back, and out the top of the stove somewhere??

Greg L
You are correct about the cold air entry at the bottom of the stove. Often these stoves were hooked up to duct work that extended through the walls on either side of the chimney to upstairs rooms. These gravity convection systems worked very well to heat areas directly over the room where the stove was located. I lived in a house that had something similiar except that the primary heat source was an open coal grate in a double walled shell. Combustion air was brought up from the basement for the fire and the ducts to the upstairs were built into the actual chimney stack. Air was admitted on each side of the firebox by grills on either side of the iron firebox frame, then it was sent upstairs to exit into the bedroom above.

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nortcan
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Post Mon. May. 07, 2012 9:41 pm

Some photos showing the grate and the hidden small doors to access to the grate shaker connection. Just too bad there is no dust damper there. Hope I could make something to keep the dust in.
The grate has a rotation movement and a up and down dumping move.
Attachments
Sunnyside grate 001.JPG
New Grate
grate 003.JPG
Doors to the grate end
grate 004.JPG
Doors open
Sunnyside grate 002.JPG

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wsherrick
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Location: High In The Poconos

Post Tue. May. 08, 2012 1:16 am

It's missing the dust cover that the shaker handle goes through. It had one there originally. It shouldn't be too hard to make one out of a piece of steel. See if there are guides on the top and bottom insides to fit the dust cover in to.

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nortcan
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Post Tue. May. 08, 2012 11:18 am

wsherrick wrote:It's missing the dust cover that the shaker handle goes through. It had one there originally. It shouldn't be too hard to make one out of a piece of steel. See if there are guides on the top and bottom insides to fit the dust cover in to.
I didn't see any guide like in the Bride but I will re-check for that.
Do you know if there were many stoves then having a so small exit connector (4")?
An other question, about the grate, is it possible that some stoves were make for stove size only, cause I find the "holes/spaces" in the grate quite large?
If you permit I will be back with some more question about it. Thanks.

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wsherrick
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size
Location: High In The Poconos

Post Wed. May. 09, 2012 12:50 am

nortcan wrote:
wsherrick wrote:It's missing the dust cover that the shaker handle goes through. It had one there originally. It shouldn't be too hard to make one out of a piece of steel. See if there are guides on the top and bottom insides to fit the dust cover in to.
I didn't see any guide like in the Bride but I will re-check for that.
Do you know if there were many stoves then having a so small exit connector (4")?
An other question, about the grate, is it possible that some stoves were make for stove size only, cause I find the "holes/spaces" in the grate quite large?
If you permit I will be back with some more question about it. Thanks.
Yes, a lot of stoves with larger fire pots were made for stove sized coal.
If I were you I would get a different grate for the stove with smaller openings so you can burn Nut size in it, unless you want to keep both sizes of coal at home. These tilt type shaker grates are common and you can find one with much smaller openings for smaller coal.
I don't know how many stoves had 4 inch flue collars. A lot of big base burners have 5 inch collars and they work fine. I wouldn't be too worried about the flue collar.

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SteveZee
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Post Thu. May. 10, 2012 9:28 am

Hello Pierre,

And Hi to everyone else. I too have been on "sabbatical" for a bit taking care of a few things and working on the old homestead here. Believe it or not, my Herald is still going. It's been rainy and damp here for several weeks (mud season) and the Herald has kept the place comfy. Burning about a bag ever 2 days so 20lb a day. I finished my 5 tons bulk off in April and have been buying a few bag a week to get by.
That's a nice Baltimore you found Pierre! I know you were looking for some time now and glad you found one! I don't that "dust cover" on the shaker handle of my Herald either. It helps to have one for lower heat levels too. Those guides are the key to it working properly because it has to slide with the shaker handle and not bind up but also seal fairly well.

I'll have to catch up a bit by reading through the posts but for now its back to the grind of removing a second floor deck off the front porch so I can re-roof the porch, then seamless gutters and re glaze all the porch windows. Scraping and repainting front side (one fer year) is also in cards. Its the prep that takes all the time as I have a Graco pump that paints very quickly. But I digress....
Congrates on the new base heater Pierre. I'm on the lookout for a #6 (like everyone else) or at minimum a Modern Oak 116 w/ backpipe. By the way Pierre, I've used some stove coal I got a deal on in my 10" Herald and it works great. Burns hot but not as long as the nut. Like to try it in my Glenwood cookstove this season too. Probably will get a mix of 4 tons nut to 2 tons stove, bulked this year.

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nortcan
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Post Thu. May. 10, 2012 12:26 pm

Thanks Steve,
Hope you find a Gl.No.6, they are all a stove.
Take it easy on the remolding of your house and have a nice Sunnyside oops, sorry Summer time

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nortcan
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Post Thu. May. 10, 2012 12:30 pm

wsherrick wrote:
nortcan wrote: I didn't see any guide like in the Bride but I will re-check for that.
Do you know if there were many stoves then having a so small exit connector (4")?
An other question, about the grate, is it possible that some stoves were make for stove size only, cause I find the "holes/spaces" in the grate quite large?
If you permit I will be back with some more question about it. Thanks.
Yes, a lot of stoves with larger fire pots were made for stove sized coal.
If I were you I would get a different grate for the stove with smaller openings so you can burn Nut size in it, unless you want to keep both sizes of coal at home. These tilt type shaker grates are common and you can find one with much smaller openings for smaller coal.
I don't know how many stoves had 4 inch flue collars. A lot of big base burners have 5 inch collars and they work fine. I wouldn't be too worried about the flue collar.
Because the grate is a heavy duty style new/recast, maybe I will get some gaps fill with some metal and make the grate a little more aggressive at the same time?

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nortcan
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Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
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Location: Qc Canada

Post Thu. May. 10, 2012 12:33 pm

Some more photos on the internal MPD/link and on the direct/base b. system.
Attachments
DSC04444.JPG
MPD link
DSC04436.JPG
Adjustments notches
DSC04442.JPG
Direct draft
DSC04443.JPG
Base burning mode
DSC04447.JPG
Direct/base burning lever

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nortcan
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Post Thu. May. 10, 2012 12:43 pm

Greg, from the floor to the top of the exit connector= 29 1/4"
Attachments
DSC04434.JPG

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LsFarm
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Post Thu. May. 10, 2012 12:54 pm

nortcan wrote:Greg, from the floor to the top of the exit connector= 29 1/4"
I guess I'll have to make a special indirect back pipe for a stove, with a low flue exit height or tear apart the fieldstone fireplace and rebuild the firebox.

Unfortunately, this is a steel firebox with the masonry built around it.. so it will be a real mess if I open it up..

I'll probably not do anythng with this fireplace.

Greg L
Burning Pea/Buckwheat through an antique stoker [semi retired SSboiler],
Running an Axeman-Anderson 260M boiler burning Pea, About 150-250#per day
Farming, Fixing, Fabricating and Flying: 'spare time' what's that?

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nortcan
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Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride
Location: Qc Canada

Post Thu. May. 10, 2012 9:08 pm

LsFarm wrote:
nortcan wrote:Greg, from the floor to the top of the exit connector= 29 1/4"
I guess I'll have to make a special indirect back pipe for a stove, with a low flue exit height or tear apart the fieldstone fireplace and rebuild the firebox.

Unfortunately, this is a steel firebox with the masonry built around it.. so it will be a real mess if I open it up..

I'll probably not do anythng with this fireplace.

Greg L

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