"Jack" Stove (Boiler for Domestic Hot Water)

Modern and vintage hand fired coal stove are similar to a wood stove and in some cases can burn either. They need to be regulated and fed by hand usually every 12 to 24 hours depending on your usage. They require no power to operate making them ideal for rural settings with long power outages.
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Yanche
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Posts: 3032
Joined: Fri. Dec. 23, 2005 12:45 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Alternate Heating Systems S-130
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea
Location: Sykesville, Maryland

Post Mon. Jan. 01, 2007 11:43 pm

I grew up in a home heated with an Anthracite hand fired boiler. It provide central heat plus hot water. In summer a much smaller, 24-30 inch tall cast iron boiler was used to heat domestic hot water. My parents called it a "Jack Stove". Does anyone know of this term? Is it a generic name or perhaps a brand name? It really wasn't a stove but a small boiler with 1 inch supply and return fittings. The supply came out the top in a vertical pipe that had a clamped on gadget that regulated the fire box draft. Best I remember it was a 6-8 inch flat cylinder that was heated by the pipe. It had a chain that went to the hinged firebox door. As the pipe got hot the door opened increasing the draft over the firebox. Completly passive system. Wish I had it today.

Yanche

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Charlie Z
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Posts: 205
Joined: Sat. Dec. 23, 2006 9:39 am
Stove/Furnace Make: Coalbrookdale
Stove/Furnace Model: Darby
Location: North Fork, NY

Post Tue. Jan. 02, 2007 7:32 am

Sounds like a great idea (though, I'm having trouble imagining a 'flat cylinder'). :P

I estimate that ~40% (30 gal/mo) of my annual oil bill is year-round DHW. I'd like to have a modern one for year-round use.

- Charlie

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Yanche
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Posts: 3032
Joined: Fri. Dec. 23, 2005 12:45 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Alternate Heating Systems S-130
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea
Location: Sykesville, Maryland

Post Tue. Jan. 02, 2007 10:57 am

I guess I should have said flat disk. It was about 8 inches in diameter and maybe two inches thick. I suspect it had two pieces of bi-metalic metal in it. As it warmed up from the pipe it was clamped to it deflected a long lever arm that projected from one disk. The lever arm moved up and via a chain opened the firebox door. I'll post my question on another Anthracite forum and see if I get an answer there.

Yanche

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LsFarm
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Posts: 7385
Joined: Sun. Nov. 20, 2005 8:02 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland
Location: Michigan

Post Tue. Jan. 02, 2007 9:21 pm

Hi Yanche, Is this what you mean???
**Broken Link(s) Removed**Greg L
Burning Pea/Buckwheat through an antique stoker [semi retired SSboiler],
Running an Axeman-Anderson 260M boiler burning Pea, About 150-250#per day
Farming, Fixing, Fabricating and Flying: 'spare time' what's that?

Oo-v-oO
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Posts: 70
Joined: Sat. Jan. 07, 2006 11:47 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Ashley
Location: Live Free or Die, USA

Post Wed. Jan. 03, 2007 12:20 am

Either way, that's a neat looking piece of equipment!
-Lee, KB1GNI
"Felix qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas"
[Happiness is understanding how things work]

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Yanche
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Posts: 3032
Joined: Fri. Dec. 23, 2005 12:45 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Alternate Heating Systems S-130
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea
Location: Sykesville, Maryland

Post Wed. Jan. 03, 2007 12:48 am

Yes, that's the design. The one my parents had was very similar. Note the tab on the hinged firebox door. That's where the draft regulator chain was hooked. The shaker grates were operated the same way, with a front removable crank handle. The ebay listing gave me some hints for finding these units. I'm 40-50 miles south of PA Amish area. Wonder what they use today?

Yanche

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