Warm Morning 400B

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duryeaburner
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Posts: 23
Joined: Sun. May. 17, 2009 12:10 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: locke
Stove/Furnace Model: warm morning 400b
Location: NEPA

Post Sun. May. 17, 2009 1:14 pm

just bought a warm morning 400B stove. I am looking for a owner's manual as I have never burned coal and need to know how to and what controls the and regulates the coal burning process. also looking for any useful info concerening it's installation. I will be hooking to an exixting chimney that runs thru the center of my house. am replacing an oil furnace and want to know if a ss liner is necessary?

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rockwood
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Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Stokermatic coal furnace
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Baseburners & Antiques: Malleable/Monarch Range
Coal Size/Type: Soft coal: Lump and stoker (slack coal)
Location: Utah

Post Sun. May. 17, 2009 2:12 pm

Hey duryeaburner,
I don't have a manual but a brochure was posted here some time ago.
Manual for Locke Warm Morning Model 400 ???
Below is an attached pdf file with replacement parts that you might want to see, just scroll down to warm morning in the stove manufactures section.
I have a couple questions.
Are you planning to burn hard (anthracite) or soft (bituminous) coal?
What size is your chimney (masonry 8"x8" etc.) that this stove will be connected to and will any other appliances be connected to this same flue?
When you say "replacing an oil furnace", do you mean this new stove will be the only heat source for your home?
Where do you plan on putting the stove (basement etc.)?
Attachments
2008_parts_pricing_retail_rev_09_02_2008 warm morning parts.pdf
(2.01 MiB) Downloaded 129 times

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duryeaburner
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Posts: 23
Joined: Sun. May. 17, 2009 12:10 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: locke
Stove/Furnace Model: warm morning 400b
Location: NEPA

Post Sun. May. 17, 2009 3:13 pm

thanx for the reply rockwood

I will be burning hard coal and have an 8x8 brick chimney. this will be the only appliance connected to it. I installed and heated with two propane stoves last year as my oil furnace was old and showing signs of failure, not to mention expensive to run. this new stove will hopefully be my primary source of heat. It will be placed centrally in the basment and was planning on cutting vents in the first floor to let the heat rise out of the basment and heat the rest or the house.

sharkman8810
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: hitzer 82 ul
Coal Size/Type: nut
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Location: south central pa

Post Sun. May. 17, 2009 9:14 pm

I don't know much about this specific stove, but warm morning have a pretty good rep. I'd recommend if you can, build a heat collector around the stove, and duct it with fans. It will be more efficient, better to heat the floors you live in, than waste the heat warming below ground masonry. I'd imagine the basics of coal burning all apply and doing some searches and reading stickies will get you started.

My take is that if the masonry chimney is in good repair, no reason not to. I'd look up it as best as I could to see if it was unobstructed, and the current liner (if any) is ok. Coal or wood for that matter don't specifically require a special liner, just a proper draft, and if the existing chimney drafts, then it should be fine.

The next item is to connect the stove to the chimney using stove pipe and not more than 2 90 degree elbows, and to fit a barometric damper in. alot of people use a "T" with a baro at one end of the "T".

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rockwood
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Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Stokermatic coal furnace
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Rockwood Stoveworks Circulator
Baseburners & Antiques: Malleable/Monarch Range
Coal Size/Type: Soft coal: Lump and stoker (slack coal)
Location: Utah

Post Mon. May. 18, 2009 1:10 am

Sounds like you have a good plan going. You have a good chimney and what I consider to be a good stove.
This stove should have an automatic temperature/draft control on the stove controlling air intake to the stove thus controlling heat output and it will take some time next fall to get a routine down for running this stove. It would help if you read through the many topics in "hand fired coal stoves" on this forum for loading, shaking etc. There's even some video that members have posted of tending their stoves that can help. Keep it simple though, I think it's easy for people to make "tending the stove" more complicated than it needs to be.
As has been mentioned, I also recommend a barometric damper for this stove if using hard coal. If you're unfamiliar with these dampers just search this forum as there is a lot of info about them.
Another thing to think about is where your coal bin will be. You'll want it close and convenient, some people have bins in their basement, garage or outside bins.
Be sure to get carbon monoxide detectors if you don't already have them. Safety first :)

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duryeaburner
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Joined: Sun. May. 17, 2009 12:10 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: locke
Stove/Furnace Model: warm morning 400b
Location: NEPA

Post Mon. May. 18, 2009 12:21 pm

hey guys thanx for support and advice
got the stove in the basement today and did thorough inspection.looks in very good shape but I'm no expert.
First of many questions. THere exist a few cracks in the fire blocks and finding them for this model though possible, as I read elseware in this very useful forum,will be expensive.
am attaching some pics of the stove and the fire chamber. What do you think?
Attachments
ciimney and inside stove 002.jpg
ciimney and inside stove 005.jpg
ciimney and inside stove 023.jpg

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duryeaburner
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Posts: 23
Joined: Sun. May. 17, 2009 12:10 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: locke
Stove/Furnace Model: warm morning 400b
Location: NEPA

Post Mon. May. 18, 2009 12:52 pm

my next obsticle to the installation is the chimney. the place where the old furnace connected has alot of damage due to numerous past appliances attached at one time or another in the past eighty years or so.
the terracotta has been smashed to bits at the openings. can this be replaced or could I simply run ss pasted the smashed terra and re brick around it. the rest of the chimney looks good I think. again I'm no
expert. anothe weird find was that the base of the chimney is filled with coal ashes to the hole. am thinking this was done to prevent any gasses from escaping after the oil furnace was installed or because
a clean out was no longer needed. any ideas? and is a clean out even necessary when I install my stove?
Attachments
ciimney and inside stove 015.jpg
ciimney and inside stove 019.jpg
ciimney and inside stove 013.jpg

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cokehead
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Stove/Furnace Make: Locke, Godin, Tarm in da works
Stove/Furnace Model: Warm Morning 617-A, 3721, 502
Location: Mystic, CT
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Post Mon. May. 18, 2009 6:20 pm

duryeaburner wrote: anothe weird find was that the base of the chimney is filled with coal ashes to the hole. am thinking this was done to prevent any gasses from escaping after the oil furnace was installed or because
a clean out was no longer needed. any ideas? and is a clean out even necessary when I install my stove?
My opinion is that the base of chimney is full due to neglect. So long as flow of the flue gases is not restricted it doesn't matter that much. If you clean it out make sure the clean out door closes reasonably tight so it doesn't reduce your draft due to major leaks. Burning coal you will get fly ash with antracite and lots of soot with bituminous. You will need a way to check for excesive build-ups and a way to clean it out. If you don't have a clean out at the base of the chimney you will have to do it by removing the stove pipe. I find the fly ash accumilates in the horizontal sections of stove pipe and over a few years the pipe will rust out where the fly ash collects.
Last edited by cokehead on Tue. May. 19, 2009 1:11 am, edited 1 time in total.

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cokehead
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Joined: Thu. Dec. 27, 2007 8:28 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Locke, Godin, Tarm in da works
Stove/Furnace Model: Warm Morning 617-A, 3721, 502
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Post Mon. May. 18, 2009 6:29 pm

duryeaburner wrote: It will be placed centrally in the basment and was planning on cutting vents in the first floor to let the heat rise out of the basment and heat the rest or the house.
Been there, done that. It didn't work for me. I did not do ductwork. The stove was next to the basement stairs and I left the basement door open. Against my wife's wishes, I moved my stove to the first floor. Now we can feel the burn. :) She is ok with it now.
Last edited by cokehead on Tue. May. 19, 2009 1:17 am, edited 2 times in total.

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cokehead
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Posts: 1951
Joined: Thu. Dec. 27, 2007 8:28 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Locke, Godin, Tarm in da works
Stove/Furnace Model: Warm Morning 617-A, 3721, 502
Location: Mystic, CT
Contact:

Post Mon. May. 18, 2009 6:33 pm

duryeaburner wrote:THere exist a few cracks in the fire blocks
A few chips or cracks are no big deal. The brick will still do their job. Don't go to needless expense tring to make it perfect. It won't stay that way.

sharkman8810
Member
Posts: 359
Joined: Wed. Mar. 05, 2008 7:27 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: hitzer 82 ul
Coal Size/Type: nut
Stove/Furnace Make: hitzer
Stove/Furnace Model: 82 u.l.
Location: south central pa

Post Mon. May. 18, 2009 9:43 pm

It looks like your on the right track. I think you have a good stove and chimney. I don't know much about doing the connection and installing a thimble. With a stove that size I would definitely at least put a heat collector hood above it, and use a duct fan to a vent in the floor. Also don't forget to put in a cold air return opposite the vent(s). You would be surprised on how well a system like that will work. I heated about 2400 s.f. 2 story house with basement with about 500 cfm fan blowing hot air from the heat jacket and 2 x 250 cfm fans for the cold air return. Used just a little over 3 tons.

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