Coal/Wood Stove Plans

Modern and vintage hand fired coal stove are similar to a wood stove and in some cases can burn either. They need to be regulated and fed by hand usually every 12 to 24 hours depending on your usage. They require no power to operate making them ideal for rural settings with long power outages.
sean
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Posts: 4
Joined: Sun. Jan. 20, 2008 2:58 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Garstang (self built)
Stove/Furnace Model: Galactic Warmer

Post Sun. Oct. 19, 2008 3:05 pm

Ok, well the firebox is going to be 8" diameter and probably about 10" tall, maybe 2 by 2" parallel pipes would be an improvement then.
I was thinking while on the dock earlier, my tub has 3 cabins, if I put the fire in the rear, theres no warmth for the front, so rather than have 2 of these, instead of putting sand into the aforementioned cavity between the firebox and outer wall, leave it hollow and use a cars heater blower fan to circulate air through the cavity and through a flexible pipe to the front cabin, and maybe a tap to give some heat to the engine in winter before starting.
Sean.

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sean
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Posts: 4
Joined: Sun. Jan. 20, 2008 2:58 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Garstang (self built)
Stove/Furnace Model: Galactic Warmer

Post Tue. Oct. 28, 2008 4:28 am

heres the prototype guys,
works well, fisrt fire was with charcoal and it burned with blue flames after the initial volatile period, and lasted 4 hours, it didnt burn off the zinc primer.
considering a secondary air system, maybe fan assisted just as a start assist, your not allowed fires in the marina.

the picture shows the stove without a air inlet/damper, this was fitted to the base of the door before the test fire, I'm contemplating making another door, and feeding primary air in through a tube at the base of the stove to evenly distribute it.

earl
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Post Sat. Nov. 28, 2009 9:05 pm

berlin, i'm new to this forum,and most of the internet for that mater. I am building the coal/wood stove in the plans and am not sure about the dimensions of the stainless hollow baffel? does it go across the entire back of the stove?. I am looking forward to warming up the barn this winter with your design thanks ,earl

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Berlin
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Posts: 1847
Joined: Thu. Feb. 09, 2006 1:25 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Will-Burt Combustioneer 77B
Coal Size/Type: Ohio BITUMINOUS pea stoker coal
Location: Buffalo/Adirondacks, NY

Post Sun. Nov. 29, 2009 12:11 am

it doesn't have to be stainless, in fact give me a call if you wish and I can go over it with you: 716-574-1009

The only thing I would change from those plans I posted a few years ago would be to have the secondary air feed pipe enter not above the grate through the coalbed, but rather above the front door and go straight across to the hollow baffle; I would change this because even using stainless, the pipe will burn through after about two seasons, mabey less when it runs above the grate through the coal bed.
Burning western Pennsylvania Bituminous in WNY using model 77 stoker furnace. BITUMINOUS equiptment: 2 hand fired stoves of my own design, Many Combustioneer Model 77 stokers, stokermatic furnace, Many Will-Burt stokers, & and Two Iron firemen.

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coaledsweat
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Posts: 9826
Joined: Fri. Oct. 27, 2006 2:05 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea
Location: Guilford, Connecticut

Post Sun. Nov. 29, 2009 8:14 am

Berlin wrote:it doesn't have to be stainless
I would avoid S/S if at all possible, it is a difficult material to work with. Oh yeah, it is a bit pricey too.
Nothing is impossible for people who don't have to do it themselves.

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steinkebunch
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Posts: 174
Joined: Thu. Feb. 15, 2007 3:01 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Homemade Bituminous Hand-Fed
Stove/Furnace Model: Prill underfed stoker Model M8
Location: Wyoming

Post Tue. Dec. 22, 2009 4:27 pm

Berlin wrote:
The only thing I would change from those plans I posted a few years ago would be to have the secondary air feed pipe enter not above the grate through the coalbed, but rather above the front door and go straight across to the hollow baffle;
But I thought that when you dump a bucket of coal on an old coal bed, you would need the secondary pipe laying in the bottom of the coal bed next to hot coals to get the secondary air hot enough to burn the volatiles. With the pipe suspended 6" or more above a fresh, black coal bed, wouldn't your temps cool so much that you'd be unable to ignite the volatiles that accumulate over a smoldering coal bed?

I like the idea of avoiding the pipe in the coals due to corrosion, but I'm just not sure it would work. I can see it working well with wood though.

If you can convince me that raising the secondary pipe would still burn the volatiles from the coal, I'd modify my homemade hand-fed in short order to get a cleaner burn.

Steinke

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Berlin
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Posts: 1847
Joined: Thu. Feb. 09, 2006 1:25 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Will-Burt Combustioneer 77B
Coal Size/Type: Ohio BITUMINOUS pea stoker coal
Location: Buffalo/Adirondacks, NY

Post Wed. Dec. 23, 2009 12:34 am

yes, it would decrease the efficiency on low burn and the volitiles wouldn't flair properly on low fire. It does seem to work fine w/ high/mid fire. I would say that's an acceptable sacrafice of efficiency for longevity.
Burning western Pennsylvania Bituminous in WNY using model 77 stoker furnace. BITUMINOUS equiptment: 2 hand fired stoves of my own design, Many Combustioneer Model 77 stokers, stokermatic furnace, Many Will-Burt stokers, & and Two Iron firemen.

hufftracey
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Post Thu. Jan. 14, 2010 11:19 am

Do you have an updated version of your plans? I am a bit confused on the grate. I understand how it slides but how does it shake and grind? Thanks.

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Berlin
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Posts: 1847
Joined: Thu. Feb. 09, 2006 1:25 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Will-Burt Combustioneer 77B
Coal Size/Type: Ohio BITUMINOUS pea stoker coal
Location: Buffalo/Adirondacks, NY

Post Fri. Jan. 29, 2010 2:02 pm

basically, it's just a 3/4" and 1/2" rebar grid that's welded on either side to two pieces of angle iron. The angle iron the grate is welded to slides back and forth on two pieces of angle iron welded to the body of the stove. One piece of the rebar the grate is made from is extended through the side of the stove where there is about a 4" loop of rebar welded onto it where the "lever" is "attached". there is no "rocking" etc. motion; only sliding. This sliding motion is enough to drop the ashes without issue into the ash pan. the top layer of rebar on your grate has to be perpendicular to the sliding motion of the grate; this makes it act like a giant file grinding up chunks and ash and droping them into the ash pan. I've found this to work more sucessfully than grates that "rock" back and forth; they tend to get hung up on clinkers and sometimes break.
Burning western Pennsylvania Bituminous in WNY using model 77 stoker furnace. BITUMINOUS equiptment: 2 hand fired stoves of my own design, Many Combustioneer Model 77 stokers, stokermatic furnace, Many Will-Burt stokers, & and Two Iron firemen.

murphyslaw
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Posts: 150
Joined: Fri. Nov. 20, 2009 8:11 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Hitzer
Stove/Furnace Model: Model 82
Location: South Central, Alaska

Post Sun. Jul. 18, 2010 10:38 am

If built to spec what would the BTU output be with 8k/btu fuel? I don't remember the formula. Will mostlikely need to expand it to get the heat output I'm looking for. I need to be able to get upwards of 100k/btu out of a stove. Mostly would be operated at around 50-60 I'm guessing.

jimboco
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Stove/Furnace Make: harman super magnum
Stove/Furnace Model: super magnum

Post Tue. Sep. 21, 2010 1:27 am

test post

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nortcan
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Posts: 3080
Joined: Sat. Feb. 20, 2010 3:32 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride
Location: Qc Canada

Post Thu. Sep. 23, 2010 12:20 pm

Hi, Berlin or someone else. My question may look stupid but I Would like to know what is a Rebar. I saw that word a few time but I'm not able to translate it in French. Very interesting to read your posts C./W. S.plans. Just to add an opinion, when I modified my Vigilant 11, I made sure to have NO horizontal surface in the combustion chamber so there would be no place for ash buildup as I had before. I think it helps on the long run.
Salutations from Qc

samhill
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Posts: 11333
Joined: Thu. Mar. 13, 2008 10:29 am
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: keystoker 160
Hand Fed Coal Stove: hitzer 75 in garage
Stove/Furnace Make: keystoker/hitzer
Stove/Furnace Model: koker 160/ hitzer 75
Location: Linesville, Pa.

Post Thu. Sep. 23, 2010 12:56 pm

Hi nortcan, rebar is just a term commonly used for the reinforcement rod or bar that is used in poured concrete roadways & such, normally made with a low carbon steel & it has a roughness to it to add in attaching to concrete. Hope it helps, you have most likely seen it.
"Any fool can criticize, condemn & complain & most fools do." Benjamin Franklin

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Rob R.
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Posts: 11354
Joined: Fri. Dec. 28, 2007 4:26 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Coal Size/Type: Lehigh Rice
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy
Location: Chazy, NY

Post Thu. Sep. 23, 2010 1:01 pm

nortcan wrote:I Would like to know what is a Rebar.
rebar.jpg

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nortcan
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Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride
Location: Qc Canada

Post Thu. Sep. 23, 2010 2:33 pm

Thanks for the infos and photo. I knew the product but didn't knew the name of it. Good teachers...
Salutations

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