Penn Aire Furnace?

Modern and vintage hand fired coal stove are similar to a wood stove and in some cases can burn either. They need to be regulated and fed by hand usually every 12 to 24 hours depending on your usage. They require no power to operate making them ideal for rural settings with long power outages.
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coalbucket
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Posts: 15
Joined: Mon. Feb. 23, 2009 2:00 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Harmon
Stove/Furnace Model: Magnum
Location: Hop Bottom, PA.

Post Mon. Feb. 23, 2009 3:37 pm

I bought a income house in Wilkes Barre last year and in the basement under the steps was an old furnace. At the time of purchase of the home I was unconcerned about it and thought it was incomplete because it was with out a shroud and in pieces. The home has a gas boiler and works fine. After clean up of the basement in the old coal bin was this heavy cast iron "doughnut " shaped piece. What the @$%# is this?
Well I put two and two together and figured it went with the furnace, but not sure how. It's an Penn Aire 1836 made buy the Union mfg. ,Boyertown PA. So anyway dug it out and with some trial and error got it together, did some research on the web and found 4 foundries in Boyertown. Started calling them and talk to one person and he said " Yep we made that ,bout hundred years ago", and no we don't have any parts for ya or( pics). So I set out to get this old girl to back into shape, not sure if I was wasting my time or what.
I took a long weekend to make sure I had enough time to watch this thing constantly, didn't want a run away furnace when I went to bed. Early Sat. morning built a small wood fire, and sure it burned, then started to add my coal of the nut size. Well that went pretty well, lets added more coal to it. Before I know it this thing is throwing off heat like a, well .....like a furnace. So now I have a supplement heat source, with my Harmon. The furnace goes through 2-5 gal. buckets a day and the Harman doesn't have to work so hard. The place I buy my rice was out, they had plenty of nut and pea. (we all ways have nut he said). So far so good.

I'm running two stoves but well worth the cost (time) and the comfort, well worth it. I posted some pics, does any one have one of these in operation with the shroud in place?
Thanks coalbuket
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DOUG
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Stove/Furnace Make: CHUBBY, D.S.MACHINE BOILER
Stove/Furnace Model: CLAYTON 1600
Location: PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA

Post Mon. Feb. 23, 2009 6:56 pm

coal bucket:

That's a really nice find. It is wonderful that you were able to put it back to a functional piece of history. Great work! I'll be looking forward to seeing more pictures of your restoration. :) DOUG

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BigBarney
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Post Wed. Feb. 25, 2009 11:46 am

Do you have a picture of the grate in the furnace ?

I have an old furnace like that but much larger the

donut heat exchanger is almost 4 feet across.

It has a shaker grate and a movable center

that tips to let you dump clinkers into the ash pit.

All of the housing sheet metal was rusted away

so all thats left is the main furnace assembly.

BigBarney

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coalbucket
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Joined: Mon. Feb. 23, 2009 2:00 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Harmon
Stove/Furnace Model: Magnum
Location: Hop Bottom, PA.

Post Wed. Feb. 25, 2009 4:59 pm

Here are a few pics of the grates and the furnace in operation. Running about 200-275 deg. on the stack temp. 300 when its cold out side. Do you have any pics of the heat exchanger's front? I fabricated a plate to close in the hole that is behind the top panel above the load door. I think it's the clean out for the doughnut but not sure what it's suppose to look like.
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Grate
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Grate
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Front of stove
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Stove with make shift heat shields

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DOUG
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Stove/Furnace Make: CHUBBY, D.S.MACHINE BOILER
Stove/Furnace Model: CLAYTON 1600
Location: PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA

Post Wed. Feb. 25, 2009 5:10 pm

That's really nice. I bet that baby has the potential to put out some serious heat. Looking forward to seeing the fire. How is she burning? Do you have any plans for a more permanent jacket and duct work? Keep us posted. Thanks for the pictures and the update.

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coalbucket
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Posts: 15
Joined: Mon. Feb. 23, 2009 2:00 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Harmon
Stove/Furnace Model: Magnum
Location: Hop Bottom, PA.

Post Wed. Feb. 25, 2009 6:41 pm

Ye, I'm going to put a shroud around it this summer and start duct it to the other parts of the house. Right now it's heating pretty good though, a box fan pushes it around and the floors are nice and warm, no socks zone. :) Here it is fired up and working like a charm the last three months. Having to experiment and get the hang of it took about a week. I load it twice a day. Looking for some ideas on how to enclose it. I have an old fan and motor from a forced hot air system that might work, but I might just design a gravity / convection system. Just glad it's working now.
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Paperboy
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Joined: Tue. Nov. 04, 2008 5:08 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Alaska Kodiak; Atlanta Homesteader
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska; Atlanta
Stove/Furnace Model: Kodiak; Homesteader
Location: Upstate New York

Post Wed. Feb. 25, 2009 7:25 pm

If it were me, I would get some angle iron, maybe 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" x 1/8" thick, and make a framework around the furnace, then bolt some flat sheet metal panels on. You could cut clearance, and or access holes in the panels wherever required. You would then be able to dis-assemble it for service if needed. You could incorporate fastening the existing front panel to the framework. Just my $0.02 worth. (And probably over priced at that!)

Nice job on the resurrection, in any case. I bet Matthaus is jealous!

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DOUG
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Stove/Furnace Make: CHUBBY, D.S.MACHINE BOILER
Stove/Furnace Model: CLAYTON 1600
Location: PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA

Post Wed. Feb. 25, 2009 10:01 pm

Looks like it is burning well. That is a really nice find! I wouldn't mind having one too. I'd do some searches on the web for some pictures of old gravity coal furnaces, to see how one similar looked for some ideas. There is also a number of books on sizing gravity systems. If you can't find any, I have some titles you can look up at the library or buy at http://www.abebooks.com. Good job! :)

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lincolnmania
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Joined: Fri. Jan. 26, 2007 9:55 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: efm af-150 1982
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: alaska kodiak stoker 1986
Hand Fed Coal Stove: warm morning 1980 kenmore
Location: newtown/zerbe pa
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Post Thu. Feb. 26, 2009 12:53 am

very nice!

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UpStateMike
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Joined: Mon. Nov. 03, 2008 1:58 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Elmira Oval (in house)
Stove/Furnace Model: Round Oak d-18 (workshop)
Location: South New Berlin, NY

Post Thu. Mar. 12, 2009 3:53 pm

very awesome!

Great job understanding it's potential and making it happen. You make all of hopbottom proud!
You can put your boots in the oven, but that don't make 'em Biscuits - Grandma

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rockwood
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Joined: Sun. Sep. 21, 2008 7:37 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Stokermatic coal furnace
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Rockwood Stoveworks Circulator
Baseburners & Antiques: Malleable/Monarch Range
Coal Size/Type: Soft coal: Lump and stoker (slack coal)
Location: Utah

Post Thu. Mar. 12, 2009 10:01 pm

Looks like a good one! :) Does it have firebricks?
If not, does it glow red around the base where the coal bed is? You may have to turn the lights off to see.
"None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free." -Goethe

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coalbucket
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Stove/Furnace Make: Harmon
Stove/Furnace Model: Magnum
Location: Hop Bottom, PA.

Post Fri. Mar. 13, 2009 8:22 am

Thanks, heats very well. I just tried stove size coal and I get a longer burn vs nut. No fire brick, and yes it does it glo red when push it hard. Most of the time it's just idling, stack temp is around 120-150. The first time I pushed it above 250-300 on the stack temp I thought it was going to melt. Everywhere the bed was the furnace was cherry red, very scary at first. but after speaking with others, no fire brick and cast iron ya get the red.

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baldeagle
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Joined: Tue. Jan. 15, 2008 9:12 am
Stove/Furnace Make: Hitzer 354
Stove/Furnace Model: Hitzer 503
Location: SW Penna.

Post Fri. Mar. 13, 2009 10:04 am

Thanks for posting, it is great to see a part of history. Best, baldeagle

gregolma
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Joined: Wed. Dec. 19, 2007 11:58 am
Stove/Furnace Make: Axeman Anderson
Stove/Furnace Model: 1980 Anthratube 130
Location: Buffalo, NY

Post Fri. Mar. 13, 2009 4:32 pm

Those furnaces were all over Buffalo. Most of them are gone now, but every so often you can find one will in use converted to gas.

They usually are installed as gravity "octopuses", that is, with large round asbestos wrapped ducts that gently angle up to each room, with one single return in the rear.

I have seen one installed as a floor furnace, that is it had only one register--in the floor directly over the furnace with an open register in the ceiling to the next floor.

The metal sheath sort of looks like an Apollo space craft with a nose cone on top.

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Kaplanjc12
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: Alaska Kodiak no Hopper
Coal Size/Type: Nut or Pea
Location: Southeastern PA

Post Mon. Jan. 30, 2017 11:53 am

In case any of you are interested. $350 Penn Aire in Pottstown PA.

http://philadelphia.craigslist.org/hsh/5981887962.html

Justin

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