Update: DS Anthra Max burning wood

 
zachary193
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Post by zachary193 » Mon. Oct. 24, 2022 8:51 pm

Hoytman wrote:
Mon. Oct. 24, 2022 5:29 pm
I’m thinking it will save a lot of aggravation as well.

I have no idea why I didn’t think of it before yesterday. I guess because it’s just easier to keep letting the wood season in the stack and let the coal cruise on easy street. :lol:
You might be on to something with the coal before wood . I think your right about stove size matching the house . My 350-400 degrees is stove top temps . Ds seemed to act like that was normal temperatures for burning wood . I think I’m just to concerned about keeping coals for the next fire . I think I can get away with less coals less wood and a little more temperature. Obviously the bi metal dampener should regulate the temperature and the stove load should last relatively the same. In a perfect world this should work .

What I have a hard time understanding is the messick stove videos , vs results im getting . I don’t think there is any way we can burn these grate stoves on low that will not promote some type of creosote formation . I just think that’s the nature of the beast . Either feed the wood or feed the chimney.

the interesting part is the inside of my stove is fairly clean . Now I have only burnt maybe 2 weeks strait and the chimney has some soot .

It’s hard to be a type A personality in a Type B world .

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waytomany?s
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Post by waytomany?s » Mon. Oct. 24, 2022 8:57 pm

The type of creosote is what you need to watch for. You guys are burning fairly dry wood slowly, producing the dry powder type of creosote. It's not a big deal, keep an eye on it and if it's building up just run a brush through the chimney. If you're burning wet wood slowly, you get the wet sticky type of creosote which you can't.brush out. That's when you run a hot fire and dry it out. It can all.be dealt with, just pay attention.

 
zachary193
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Post by zachary193 » Mon. Oct. 24, 2022 9:09 pm

Hoytman wrote:
Mon. Oct. 24, 2022 5:29 pm
I’m thinking it will save a lot of aggravation as well.

I have no idea why I didn’t think of it before yesterday. I guess because it’s just easier to keep letting the wood season in the stack and let the coal cruise on easy street. :lol:

My 350-400 is stove top temp , I can’t actually see it being much more inside though . And the stove pipe temps are along what the messicks stove videos . Although the inside of my stove is clean . I think you might be on to something about burning coal now vs when it’s colder out .

I think that’s the nature of these grate stoves either burning it hotter than the hinges ! Or smoldering it on low . There more designed for coal burning rather than wood . Either feed the beast with wood or feed the chimney of dirt .

I think if we want to burn wood right now we’re just going to have to get used to running a brush through the chimney. Or burn coal

Also to the temps have not being very cold here in sw pa . Also thinking maybe a short hot fire may be enough to warm the house up for a while rather than trying to keep a wood fire burning .


It’s hard having a type A personality in a type B world

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Hoytman
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Post by Hoytman » Mon. Oct. 24, 2022 10:03 pm

Yep, more designed for coal than for wood.

As a result these stoves extract a tremendous amount of heat from the fire. That’s why with wood your stove is clean but the chimney is slightly dirty.

Enough draft with coal versus enough draft for wood and a clean chimney = light years apart.

Yep…to burn wood now in the shoulder season = 1-2 short hot fires a day. Honestly, this nothing new really. We had to do that with all the old pre-EPA wood stoves anyway before modern tube stoves and catalyst stoves. Short hot fires this time of year, or idle the coal and save the wood for deep cold winter.

I still have to wonder if these stoves won’t still extract too much heat from the chimney to keep it clean.

In a way, it’s a good problem to have…how well they throw heat into the home.


 
zachary193
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Joined: Tue. Jun. 21, 2022 4:10 pm
Location: South Western Pennsylvania
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Ds machine energy max 160
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Coal Size/Type: Blaschak nut
Other Heating: Oil/electric

Post by zachary193 » Mon. Oct. 24, 2022 11:21 pm

Absolutely a good problem to have ! How much heating oil or propane would it take to heat from the basement to maintain the upstairs at 76-78 degrees . My dad sells heating oil . He claimed one house today an average joe was a $4,000 fill up and one trust fund client was $14,000 fill up . I’m fairly insulated as my house was built in 93 . I’m getting that temperature from 6-8 splits of wood . There is a huge difference . Few understand this

FEW !

 
fig
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Post by fig » Fri. Nov. 18, 2022 9:31 am

Where is the air intake for the over fire tubes on that anthramax? I’m having a hard time understanding the anatomy of this stove.

 
pantosketcham
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Post by pantosketcham » Sat. Dec. 03, 2022 4:56 am

Fig - there are two square holes in the back corners at the top of the firebricks where secondary air comes in. Both the reburn boxes (they are square not tube shaped) have a port that fits into those holes. The reburn boxes when in hopper mode are smaller than the ones that I use when wood burning - what DS calls "front loading baffles." These two boxes create a baffle that is full of little holes and when wood burning (or front load burning coal) jet and reburn the gases as they roll up and over the baffle. Seems to work pretty well for wood.

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