Any recommendations - hand fired coal/wood combo?

 
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Sunny Boy
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Post by Sunny Boy » Sun. Mar. 07, 2021 12:44 pm

Hoytman wrote:
Sun. Mar. 07, 2021 11:32 am
Go ahead and get your prices for to do it all with stainless steel, labor for all included, then wait a while. I’d bet you can find a mason to match the price.

Four feet (4’) of 8”x8” clay liner cost me $20. Price 4 ft of Stainless steel. You can’t buy a 6inch stainless steel extension for $20, let alone a 1 ft extension for that price. The sweeps that gave me estimates wanted as much labor costs for install metal as the mason wanted for his labor, so the labor there was the same. Plus those guys make a killing off of the metal and the good stainless 316Ti isn’t cheap even if I buy it myself through Rockford Chimney Supply.

I can’t imagine using anything galvanized for a chimney lining after cutting and torching miles and miles of guard railing. That nasty yellow and toxic smoke is horrific. You learn real quick to stay on the upwind side of the smoke.
And that brick chimney will last a few lifetimes, wood or coal. Maybe as long as ten years for the metal chimney with coal.

My brick chimneys are over 100 years old, built for coal, and still working. When looking to burn coal to save money, that life-span of a chimney cost gets factored in, too. ;)

Paul


 
Hoytman
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Coal Size/Type: nut coal
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Post by Hoytman » Sun. Mar. 07, 2021 1:33 pm

Could not agree more, Paul.

 
Den034071
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Post by Den034071 » Sun. Mar. 07, 2021 2:22 pm

Duck im a mason full time 21 years . Next I R C township inspector .I suggest you run plans before your insurance company .Contact your local brick yard for referrals on full and part time masons .At this time of year you will get a better price now vs . summer .Same as contact Now for Swimming Pool vs . summer . Im and old timer and Hands Down a brick or block chimney with clay terracota liner will last a Long Time .Do your leg work and contact your brick yard .Get estimates and See The Work Done By a Few Masons .jack

 
the duck
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Post by the duck » Sun. Mar. 07, 2021 5:32 pm

Thanks everyone - lots to weigh and mull over...
Won't rule anything out at this point. Have two kids I need to put through college in the next dozen years, so I've got some bills down the road that will make chimney costs feel like pocket change...
God help us all!
Supposed to be 58 degrees this week in upstate New York - maybe the first we've seen that mark since October!
Thanks again for all the ideas and information, I appreciate it.

 
Wal
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Post by Wal » Wed. Apr. 07, 2021 10:38 pm

Just a thought , is it possible to remove your existing galvanised pipe work and replace with a flexible stainless steel liner ? I have a open fireplace and brick chimney and fitted a flexible stainless steel liner and a cowl when I fitted my Parlor stove . The liner was around £250 with a 25 year guarantee, so not to expensive , I live in the uk 🇬🇧 so maybe your local installation codes are different , just a thought .

 
the duck
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Post by the duck » Wed. Apr. 07, 2021 11:44 pm

Thanks - that's kind of what I was envisioning, with the ss liner. If you look at my pics somewhere earlier in this thread, you can see that my chimney is framed in with lumber and vinyl siding, and I'm afraid this is where local code might frown on the idea. I like the general idea though, seems like it should be feasible - just have to figure out if something like a triple wall ss liner will be permissible. Hope all is well in the UK and the astrazeneca is doing the trick! I have a good friend in Weston-super-Mare, and a niece going to college there too.

 
Wal
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Post by Wal » Thu. Apr. 08, 2021 2:38 am

Whether you go for a stainless steel liner or twin wall flue pipe buy 904 grade stainless not 316 , 904 is more robust and resilient to burning coal , 316 tends to be used for wood burning stoves . Also most 904 grade will offer a lifetime warranty, so once fitted you can be fairly confident that it’s a once only job ! Hope this helps 👍.


 
Hoytman
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Coal Size/Type: nut coal
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Post by Hoytman » Thu. Apr. 08, 2021 8:45 am

Not sure they even have 904 here in the states?

We have 316Ti which they say can handle coal. Some here have good luck with it. Others not so much. We also have AL249C, I think that’s it. It is not rated for coal I don’t think but at least one member here uses it for coal. It’s rated for fuel oil I think and not such high temps, but even more corrosion existent.

 
charlesosborne2002
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Post by charlesosborne2002 » Sun. Apr. 11, 2021 10:14 pm

Rob R. wrote:
Mon. Feb. 22, 2021 11:43 am
Hitzer 254/354.

DS Machine Comfort Max 75.
Yes, I fretted over it for years and was decided on either the TLC2000 or the Comfort Max 75--both are truly made for both wood and coal with high efficiency using wood with low emissions, until the latest EPA changes. Both fuels have some wonderful stoves, but few are truly designed and made for both, with efficiency and EPA considerations.

I wound up buying a Vigilant 2 coal stove because the price was irresistible. The front doors lift off if I want to use it as a wood
fireplace, and since it is cast iron, it radiates a lot more heat than a traditional fireplace does, but it does not burn wood all night, does not heat efficiently like the two others mentioned, and it does not burn the smoke like them either.

Another issue is that convenient wood burners really want a bigger firebox than coal, to go overnight. It costs more money or takes more work to get all that wood in the small sizes--I never found anybody who sold firewood that delivered 16" logs I needed for my old wood stove, and even though it could take 18", they always delivered too many that were too long or even too fat to fit. As for EPA CO2 emissions, I have read that wood left to rot in the woods releases as much CO2 as burning it does. (Either way, carbon is oxidized.) And forests are not cut down for firewood--it is salvaged from cleaning up the woods.

I am sure everybody knows a fireplace adds a lot of value to a house when you sell it, and so does an attractive stove--all the more so if it burns both coal and wood well.

By the way, my Vigilant uses anthracite coal, but has an adapter which must be installed to burn bituminous coal (or the stove melts). Mine would probably burn wood with better control (with front stove doors closed) if I put the adapter in place. It reduces the air intake under the fire, as bituminous burns more like wood from top air, and too much bottom air could overheat it. But I only use anthracite coal, so I leave the converter in it. I think the Comfort Max and TLC2000 both have separate controls for air under and over the fire.

 
the duck
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Post by the duck » Mon. Apr. 12, 2021 4:33 pm

Thanks,
I'll look into some of those models and compare them. I'm hoping to find something that will be able to heat my 2300sqft house during a power outage. They don't happen too often, but often enough to want something stronger than a fireplace. Longest outage over the past 8 years has been 48 hours. I now have a generator too, but I like the idea of having one appliance that doesn't need any electricity at all, and cranks out more heat than the fireplace.
Thanks again for all the input,
Matt

 
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Seagrave1963
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Post by Seagrave1963 » Tue. Apr. 13, 2021 9:51 am

the duck wrote:
Mon. Apr. 12, 2021 4:33 pm
Thanks,
I'll look into some of those models and compare them. I'm hoping to find something that will be able to heat my 2300sqft house during a power outage. They don't happen too often, but often enough to want something stronger than a fireplace. Longest outage over the past 8 years has been 48 hours. I now have a generator too, but I like the idea of having one appliance that doesn't need any electricity at all, and cranks out more heat than the fireplace.
Thanks again for all the input,
Matt
That was what drove our decision on the TLC2000. We have a similar sq. ft. in a Cape Cod style and the TLC heats it very well - the upstairs is 60-65 in the coldest months (great for sleeping!) and the downstairs is 70-80 depending on preference (wife likes it cool, I like it hot). Although we bought as a "back-up" heat source, it quickly became our primary heat due to cost and "gentle" heat that didn't dry out skin. Whatever stove you go with, the coal produced heat is much better IMHO. Good Luck Duck!

 
the duck
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Post by the duck » Tue. Apr. 13, 2021 10:13 am

Seagrave1963 Thanks for the details, really good to know.
Would you be willing to post the profile picture of your TLC2000 a bit larger? Just wanted to get a look at the set-up and arrangement of it.
I still have to speak with a local chimney guy before I make any decision. Apparently my flue/chimney combination is not very conducive to changing into higher heat coal stoves, wood burners etc. My fireplace is great to look at, but is zero sum when it comes to generating heat...
Thanks again!

 
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McGiever
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Coal Size/Type: RICE,PEA,NUT,STOVE /ANTHRACITE and EGG / BIT
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Post by McGiever » Tue. Apr. 13, 2021 12:27 pm

Coal is NOT higher flue temp. Don’t let ANYONE tell you otherwise!!

A lot of us still have factory barcode stickers on stove pipe fittings from stove into thimble.

Wood is the issue with chimneys!!!

 
the duck
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Post by the duck » Tue. Apr. 13, 2021 12:44 pm

Yes, but my problem is removing old galvanized flue pipe, then running something new up through a framed-in, wood and vinyl clad enclosure. The consensus seems to be the galvanized won't work and needs to be replaced. And if i replace it, I'd like to keep the new flue pipe inside the framed-in enclosure - despite there being many good arguments for masonry chimneys.
Thanks for the input!

 
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freetown fred
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Post by freetown fred » Tue. Apr. 13, 2021 4:02 pm

It'll work--have at at it D!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :)


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