Cookin' With Coal

 
ReidH
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Post by ReidH » Sat. Feb. 20, 2021 6:40 pm

Photog200 wrote:
Fri. Feb. 19, 2021 8:27 pm
I used the mixture that I made on both pans that I used for dinner tonight.

Randy
Interesting it didn't hold as well on the carbon steel pan. The nature of the beast, I assume. The carbon steel probably needs tender handling until it builds up a decent carbon layer.

I am expecting to get the Wagner bacon and egg skillet with three compartments early next week. I will strip it and then use a different seasoning blend for each compartment. Using peameal bacon. Those little peameal/cornmeal particles are tough on cast iron seasoning.

Reid


 
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Photog200
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Post by Photog200 » Sat. Feb. 20, 2021 7:10 pm

ReidH wrote:
Sat. Feb. 20, 2021 6:40 pm
Interesting it didn't hold as well on the carbon steel pan. The nature of the beast, I assume. The carbon steel probably needs tender handling until it builds up a decent carbon layer.

I am expecting to get the Wagner bacon and egg skillet with three compartments early next week. I will strip it and then use a different seasoning blend for each compartment. Using peameal bacon. Those little peameal/cornmeal particles are tough on cast iron seasoning.

Reid
Yea, the carbon steel is so much smother that it takes longer to build up the seasoning. Some foods will pull off the seasoning but it is not hard to put it back on just by heating the pan and putting a very thin coating of oil on it and keep it on heat until it smokes. Cast iron has more texture for the seasoning to hold onto than the carbon steel.

 
ReidH
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Post by ReidH » Mon. Feb. 22, 2021 7:46 pm

The Wagner bacon and egg skillet after going through the self clean mode in the gas oven.
Three compartments to test 3 different seasoning methods.

Reid

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Photog200
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Post by Photog200 » Tue. Feb. 23, 2021 2:55 am

Here is a link to a good video of a professor of polymerization explaining pan coatings and what I was doing wrong.


Randy

 
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Hambden Bob
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Post by Hambden Bob » Tue. Feb. 23, 2021 6:16 am

Well,I'll Be Damned,Randy! Thanx for that video link! This cast iron kitchen psycho is going to get some grapeseed oil,and give it a try!

 
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coaledsweat
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Post by coaledsweat » Tue. Feb. 23, 2021 7:07 am

archangel_cpj wrote:
Tue. Jan. 19, 2021 5:37 pm
Nothing toxic actually the more expensive pizza joints in NY fire their pizza ovens with Blashak... Just dont do it on a freshly dressed stove ..
A lot of New Haven's pizza joints use coal too. Blaschak has that deal sewed up too.

 
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Post by fig » Tue. Feb. 23, 2021 7:32 am

I wonder why he didn’t mention copper? My mother has always used copper pans as well as cast iron.

On another note and this may have been mentioned before in this 185 page encyclopedia of cooking, my uncle has used the same iron skillet for as long as I can remember and never washed it. He just wipes it out when done. It stays seasoned.


 
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Hambden Bob
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Post by Hambden Bob » Tue. Feb. 23, 2021 9:24 am

Yep,Fig,as odd as it may seem,that sure seemed to be the rule of thumb regarding seasoned cast iron! Out on Da' Bay,I'll take the additional protective step of drying the Ol' Cast Iron in Da' Sunshine,then wiping it down with a light coat of veg oil. The ambient humidity's so high that if any of the seasoning coating opened it,the stuff would rust!

 
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Sunny Boy
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Post by Sunny Boy » Tue. Feb. 23, 2021 10:09 am

fig wrote:
Tue. Feb. 23, 2021 7:32 am
........................ On another note and this may have been mentioned before in this 185 page encyclopedia of cooking, my uncle has used the same iron skillet for as long as I can remember and never washed it. He just wipes it out when done. It stays seasoned.
That's what Melissa said her folks always did - never washed the pans with water, just wiped clean with a paper towel. Her Mom was the local school Home Ec teacher and that's what she taught her students.

Paul
Last edited by Sunny Boy on Tue. Feb. 23, 2021 10:21 am, edited 1 time in total.

 
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Sunny Boy
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Post by Sunny Boy » Tue. Feb. 23, 2021 10:20 am

Hambden Bob wrote:
Tue. Feb. 23, 2021 9:24 am
Yep,Fig,as odd as it may seem,that sure seemed to be the rule of thumb regarding seasoned cast iron! Out on Da' Bay,I'll take the additional protective step of drying the Ol' Cast Iron in Da' Sunshine,then wiping it down with a light coat of veg oil. The ambient humidity's so high that if any of the seasoning coating opened it,the stuff would rust!
Same here, Bob. I dry it by warming the pan, then wipe it down with a very light coating of vegetable oil.

I've found that just as with when first seasoning the pan, the trick is to not leave a lot of oil on the pan. Less is more ! ;) After wiping with oil, I wipe it with a dry paper towel and only leave enough oil that the surface is left shiny. Anymore oil coating left on than that and it gets gummy as the oil oxidizes.

That has worked very well, not just for preventing rust, but for helping to continue to season the pan because that very light coating of oil contributes to the carbon layer next time the pan is used.

Paul

 
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lsayre
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Post by lsayre » Tue. Feb. 23, 2021 11:47 am

Oil "smoke points" matter a bunch, because what follows after the "smoke point" is inevitably the "flash point".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Smoke_poin ... oking_oils

 
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Sunny Boy
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Post by Sunny Boy » Tue. Feb. 23, 2021 12:55 pm

lsayre wrote:
Tue. Feb. 23, 2021 11:47 am
Oil "smoke points" matter a bunch, because what follows after the "smoke point" is inevitably the "flash point".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Smoke_poin ... oking_oils
And right after that comes the, put on the lid point to smother the flames. ;)

Paul

 
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lsayre
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Post by lsayre » Tue. Feb. 23, 2021 2:25 pm

Refined Safflower Oil looks to be perhaps the best from the safety standpoint.

Little to no taste, plus the benefit of a 510 degree F. smoke point.

 
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Post by Sunny Boy » Tue. Feb. 23, 2021 2:50 pm

The whole point of seasoning a pan is not to see how high a smoke point to use, but to build up layers of oxidize oil to becomes carbon to fill in the grain of the cast iron. Lots of old time cooks used bacon grease to season cast iron, which has a rather low smoking point. It will season at lower oven temps, where as some ovens won't get hot enough to season with high smoke point oils. Been there and had to strip off the gummy results and start over with a lower smoke point oil. :oops:

It's those carbon layers that make the pan what people refer to as "non-stick". Which is not an accurate term because in actual use a seasoned pan still needs some type of fat or oil when doing most cooking,... unless your cooking meats with a lot of their own fat, such as bacon, or Spam.

If there's a risk of the seasoning oil catching on fire your leaving too heavy of a coating of oil on the pan. Truly one of those cases of "less is more". ;)

Paul

 
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Photog200
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Post by Photog200 » Tue. Feb. 23, 2021 3:49 pm

lsayre wrote:
Tue. Feb. 23, 2021 2:25 pm
Refined Safflower Oil looks to be perhaps the best from the safety standpoint.

Little to no taste, plus the benefit of a 510 degree F. smoke point.
The only problem with using oil with this high degree smoke point is if you are using a home oven to season the pans, most ovens only go to 500ºF. I think that is why so many of the new cast iron pan manufactures are recommending grapeseed oil, it has a smoke point of 421ºF. You can set the oven to 475º and once the oil reaches its smoke temp, that is when it will polymerize.

Randy

Edit: Sorry, just saw that Paul addressed the high smoke point oils and home ovens. :oops:


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