Going to put down about 10,000 square feet of millings

 
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Post by ColdHouse » Mon. Jun. 10, 2024 10:18 am

I have decided that I will put asphalt millings for my driveway and plan to do that relatively soon.

Today I purchased a Vibramax 265 Dual Vibratory Roller. It is about 8 feet long and weighs in at around 3 ton.

Not picking it up until Wednesday morning.

Screened millings are $14 per yard. I figure less than 100 yards, so the material is about as inexpensive as I could hope for. I figure get my neighbor to come over and spread and grade with his skid steer. I would guess about 3 days. I have no basis for that other than a guess. If I guess it cost me $750 per day for him, that is $2250 plus the millings $1400 so for $3650 plus my time, fuel, my dump trailer, my roller.... I get a new driveway!


 
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Post by waytomany?s » Mon. Jun. 10, 2024 11:21 am

You have prepped the base?

 
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Post by ColdHouse » Mon. Jun. 10, 2024 11:37 am

waytomany?s wrote:
Mon. Jun. 10, 2024 11:21 am
You have prepped the base?
Please advise.

 
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Post by waytomany?s » Mon. Jun. 10, 2024 12:43 pm

No different than laying concrete. You need a good, well drained base. Fix any potholes, low or high spots, kill weeds, etc. Millings work well in full sun, if you get them thick enough and the sun bakes them enough to stick together. If in shade they tend to crumble and be lost when you plow. Probably is dependent on how much bitumen is left in them and your weather. No different than any other project, the better you start off the better the final product.

 
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Post by Richard S. » Mon. Jun. 10, 2024 4:02 pm

When you get it done you test it out with the new Tesla, take it to one end of the driveway and point it at the other end............ then stomp on the "gas" pedal.

 
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Post by waytomany?s » Mon. Jun. 10, 2024 4:20 pm

Richard S. wrote:
Mon. Jun. 10, 2024 4:02 pm
When you get it done you test it out with the new Tesla, take it to one end of the driveway and point it at the other end............ then stomp on the "gas" pedal.
:clap: The Mrs would kill him, it's her car. All those millings would be stuck all over that thing.

 
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Post by mntbugy » Mon. Jun. 10, 2024 6:42 pm

Spray with diesel fuel. That will help melt milling together.


 
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Post by ColdHouse » Sun. Jun. 23, 2024 11:06 am

Buying a rock bucket. Getting here in a few minutes.
A few years ago I put down my version of a Soil Cement Driveway. I am tearing out the cement. Going to move it, remove the sandy base, going to put the broken cement down and put the sandy base on top.
I had high hopes for the Soil Cement and I think it would have worked out much better if I didn't have all the water issues from the ledge behind me.
The reason I got rid of the asphalt was because it was deteriorated and had potholes.
I surmise the potholes were from the water issues.
Now that the water issues are resolved I need to make a better driveway.
I bought the roller, have a skid steer, and plan on putting down millings after preparing my base.

 
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Post by ColdHouse » Thu. Jun. 27, 2024 7:05 am


 
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Post by ColdHouse » Fri. Jun. 28, 2024 6:36 pm

AI how to:
how to Use recycled asphalt millings for driveway
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Using recycled asphalt millings (RAM) for a driveway is a cost-effective and environmentally friendly option. Here’s a guide on how to properly use and apply recycled asphalt millings for your driveway:

Materials Needed:
Recycled Asphalt Millings (RAM): Collected from previous asphalt milling projects or obtained from asphalt recycling centers.
Grading Equipment: Such as a skid steer loader, tractor with a box blade, or grader, for spreading and compacting the millings.
Compaction Equipment: Vibratory roller or plate compactor for compacting the millings.
Water: For moistening the millings during compaction (optional).
Steps for Using Recycled Asphalt Millings:
Prepare the Driveway:

Clear the existing driveway of any debris, vegetation, or loose material. Ensure the driveway is clean and free of obstacles.
Grade and Shape:

Use grading equipment (e.g., skid steer loader, tractor with box blade) to spread the recycled asphalt millings evenly across the driveway area. The millings should be spread to achieve a compacted thickness of about 2 to 3 inches.
Moisten and Compact:

Optionally, lightly moisten the millings with water to aid in compaction. Using a vibratory roller or plate compactor, compact the millings thoroughly. Start compacting from the edges and work your way towards the center of the driveway. Ensure consistent compaction across the entire surface.
Check for Levelness:

After initial compaction, check the driveway for levelness and smoothness. Make adjustments as needed by adding or compacting more millings in low areas or removing excess in high areas.
Allow Time to Settle:

Allow the compacted recycled asphalt millings to settle for a few weeks. During this time, regular traffic and weather conditions will help further compact and stabilize the driveway surface.
Final Compaction:

After the millings have settled, perform a final round of compaction using the vibratory roller or plate compactor. This ensures a firm and stable driveway surface.
Maintain and Seal (Optional):

Consider applying a sealant or asphalt emulsion to the recycled asphalt millings to enhance durability and appearance. Follow manufacturer instructions for application and drying times.
Tips for Using Recycled Asphalt Millings:
Quality of Millings: Ensure the recycled asphalt millings are of good quality, free from large chunks and contaminants, to achieve a smooth and durable driveway surface.
Compaction: Proper compaction is crucial to prevent shifting, rutting, or erosion of the driveway over time.
Local Regulations: Check local regulations regarding the use of recycled materials for driveways and any permits required for driveway construction or modification.
By following these steps, you can effectively use recycled asphalt millings to create a functional and environmentally sustainable driveway surface. If you're unsure about any aspect of the process, consulting with a professional contractor experienced in asphalt paving and recycling can provide additional guidance and ensure a successful project.

 
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Post by ColdHouse » Fri. Jun. 28, 2024 6:46 pm

I decided to put another french drain down the edge of the driveway and under it in one place.

This house was built by an electrician. There are so many switches, lights, wires, cables, breaker panels... There were lights on the edge of the driveway and flood lights up in the trees and AC outlets on same tree on the bottom. Well I got an electrical junction box with the excavator and had to deal with that electrical issue before being able to continue.

 
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Post by ColdHouse » Sun. Jun. 30, 2024 6:48 am

Cost to put in 10,000 square foot recycled asphalt millings driveway
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The cost to install a driveway using recycled asphalt millings can vary widely based on several factors, including the area's location, the quality and availability of the millings, the complexity of the job, and any additional preparation or finishing work required. Here’s a general breakdown of the costs involved:

Material Cost:

Recycled asphalt millings typically cost less than traditional asphalt or gravel. Prices can vary based on location and supplier, but a rough estimate is around $10 to $20 per ton.

For a 10,000 square foot driveway, assuming an average depth of 4 inches (which is standard for driveways), you would need approximately 300 tons of millings.

Total estimated cost for materials:
300 tons \times $10/ton = $3,000
300 tons \times $20/ton = $6,000

Labor Cost:

Labor costs can also vary significantly depending on local labor rates, the size of the crew, and the complexity of the job.

Typically, installing asphalt millings involves grading the area, spreading the millings, and compacting them with heavy equipment.

Labor costs for such a project could range from $1 to $3 per square foot.

Total estimated labor cost:
10,000 sq ft \times $1/sq ft = $10,000
10,000 sq ft \times $3/sq ft = $30,000

Equipment and Additional Costs:

Equipment rental costs (e.g., skid steer loader, compactor) for grading and compacting the millings should also be factored in.
Additional costs may include transportation of materials, permits (if required), and any site preparation work needed.
Total Estimated Cost:

Adding together the estimated costs for materials and labor:

Total Cost Range:

Material cost range: $3,000 to $6,000
Labor cost range: $10,000 to $30,000
Therefore, the total estimated cost for installing a 10,000 square foot driveway using recycled asphalt millings could range from approximately $13,000 to $36,000.

Additional Considerations:
Quality of Millings: Ensure the quality of the recycled asphalt millings you purchase meets your requirements for durability and appearance.
Maintenance: While asphalt millings are durable, periodic maintenance such as regrading and recompacting may be necessary to maintain the driveway's integrity over time.
Professional Advice: Consulting with a contractor experienced in asphalt millings installation can provide a more accurate cost estimate and ensure the project is done correctly.
These estimates serve as a general guideline. Actual costs may vary based on specific project factors and local market conditions. Obtaining multiple quotes from reputable contractors can help in determining the most cost-effective and reliable option for your driveway installation.

 
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Post by ColdHouse » Wed. Jul. 03, 2024 6:34 am

I am working very hard on this driveway.
After putting in the last french drain from a place that notoriously pools water and running that all the way down the edge of my lower driveway, we had a downpour. I had already taken up the soil cement and had graded process and compacted it. This is going to be my third driveway here. the first had failed with huge persistent potholes. Then I had the water issues coming from the ledge behind me. I always considered that a different issue. On one side of my house there is a spring that originates way behind my property and many months of the year it flows water heavy. That doesn't affect the driveway but needed to be controlled. The hill behind me would ooze water from the ledge and it would go onto my upper driveway and eventually follow my lower driveway all the way to the road. It eroded the edge of my lower driveway. That flows when it wants and could be for months, or days. It doesn't seem to be weather dependent. I fixed both those with french drains.

Then while working on those french drains after hard rains or sometimes during them, I would go outside and monitor the water, where it was coming from, and where it was going. There were times when it was not raining and I could see moving water coming from a pothole in my soil cement driveway. You see the pothole, and then you see what looks like water then there was erosion of the driveway and subsurface. If you watched the water you could see it was a moving stream.

Anyway, after the soil cement driveway was removed and process compacted we had a torrential downpour. Once again I had major ruts and erosion in the lower driveway hill. After the rain had stopped these same places that I remember potholes and water coming out of, had water flowing out of and major erosion of my process.

Well I am done with french drains and need to get my driveway in. I have spent over $10,000 on drainage pipe, fabric, stone, and put in over 1,000 feet of french drain. But I don't want my new driveway eroding if I can help it.

So I took my excavator and dug another trench following the erosion and directed it to the bottom of the hill where the new french drain is. I had a bunch of stone left so I filled the trench with stone and covered with process. So it is not a french drain but it gives the water a place to go an is located where the water was already coming from and going. So basically there is a trench filled with stone going down the middle of my lower driveway. That happened Monday.

I have a neighbor that is very good on his skid steer. He has a track machine and grades better and faster than I can. He treats me as a paying customer when he works on big jobs like helping with the french drains or spreading out the asphalt millings. I did all the preliminary things like removing the old driveway and grading and rolling the process. I found that it doesn't do any good to put a beautiful finish grade on the process material until just before application of the millings because, that will inevitably need to be touched up again so might just as well wait until all the traffic is over and the millings are ready to be applied before doing that final finish grade. However, I believe getting it pretty graded and compacting it with the vibrating roller is time well spent. Even though the surface changes, it was getting compacted hard. So the subsurface was compacted over and over and over and was/is very firm. The little bit of dressing on top with the finish grade and rolling it doesn't change that it was compacted very good.

So Monday was spent digging and filling the trench on the lower driveway and regrading and compacting the process. I had at least 4 loads of process brought in. I had a great subsurface but brought in the process to remove dips and blemishes so we could make the subsurface as level and grades as we wanted and have it compacted good with the roller. End of day Monday, We had the upper driveway all finish graded and compacted and ready for millings and Monday evening I had a truck of milling dropped at the end of that driveway so that we would have something to start with for Tuesday morning.

My neighbor started spreading and grading the millings. I did some handwork around the garage entrances, and I moved process on the lower driveway. I kept working the lower driveway until the new millings were ready to roll. We had 6 or 7 truckloads of millings dropped off pretty much one after another. I had 2 loads of process also dropped. One was first thing in the morning and I ended up just moving with a skid steer out of the way. I think it is a good idea to have process because the time to fix blemishes in the subsurface is prior to the millings. So John, the neighbor, was doing his thing with the millings and I was working ahead of him fixing blemishes and compacting the subsurface and then working behind him rolling the millings.

At this point we only have the lower hill left the finish. That second load of process I had dropped around 2pm on Tuesday and I finish graded the lower hill and compacted it. We still have more process so if there are any more areas that need touched up before milling application, we have the process on site.

There was a bank that seemed out of place. I removed a smaller tree and moved a bunch of wood chips and then dug out the bank. It seemed out of place and would always be having debris falling onto my driveway. Don't you know after removing the tree and the bank, it gives me enough access to drive around my pallet rack garage and do a loop. This area is on a slope and all that good earth that was taken from the center of the driveway was put in that area to create some resemblance of another driveway. So the point is I can use more process and probably more millings. Because that will get done after the main driveway is finished.

 
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Post by ColdHouse » Wed. Jul. 03, 2024 6:47 am

So I am doing this Recycled Asphalt Millings Driveway. Someone here and many others have suggested spraying diesel on the millings to soften them up. Researching anything is difficult. There are always those for and those against.

I am in the situation of having to do this job and now is the time. I read that diesel helps and that diesel is not good for asphalt. I read a lot is bad a little is good. I have watched video's on Calcium Chloride.... Well I don't know. I have this project happening in real time right now. I have an F450 with a 100 gallon auxiliary tank on the back. I have diesel and am not too cheap to use it. But is it the right thing to do? Calcium chloride is expensive. That is supposed to help keep dust down and take moisture from the air and help compact the millings. My millings seemed pretty compact. The video I watched a guy used a fertilizer spreader and spread the calcium on top of his finished driveway. You see the calcium now and a few hours later you do not.

So this driveway is new and I can spread calcium chloride on it if I decide later, I can spray diesel on it if I decide later. I own a roller and can compact this as much as I want. I have plenty of garden hose and can water and compact until I am sick of compacting...

Our Forum owner recently introduced us to ChatGPT so I searched out these questions. My logical gut reaction today while I am still in the process of finishing the install is that water and compaction is the key but here are the questions and results.
apply diesel on recycled asphalt millings
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Applying diesel on recycled asphalt millings is a method sometimes used to rejuvenate the material, making it more pliable and easier to compact. Here are some considerations and steps involved in using diesel on recycled asphalt millings:

Purpose: Diesel is applied to recycled asphalt millings primarily to soften the material and reduce its viscosity. This makes it easier to work with during compaction and helps achieve better bonding between particles.

Application: Diesel is typically applied as a light spray over the surface of the recycled asphalt millings. It can be applied using spraying equipment or watering trucks, ensuring even coverage across the entire area.

Mixing: After applying diesel, the millings are often mixed using a grader or other equipment to distribute the diesel and integrate it into the material. This process helps to evenly coat the particles and improve workability.

Compaction: Once the diesel is applied and the millings are mixed, compaction can proceed using heavy rollers (e.g., steel drum rollers) to achieve a dense and stable surface or base.

Considerations: It's important to note the following when using diesel on recycled asphalt millings:

Environmental Impact: Diesel is a petroleum-based product, and its use should be managed responsibly to minimize environmental impact. Proper containment and disposal practices should be followed to prevent contamination of soil or water sources.

Regulations: Local regulations may govern the use of diesel or similar substances on construction sites. Ensure compliance with environmental regulations and obtain necessary permits or approvals before application.

Effectiveness: The effectiveness of using diesel can vary depending on factors such as the age and condition of the recycled asphalt millings, weather conditions, and the specific goals of the project.

While diesel application can be a technique to enhance the workability of recycled asphalt millings, it's essential to consider alternative methods and consult with experienced professionals to determine the most appropriate approach for your specific project needs and environmental considerations.

You
keep new recycled asphalt driveway moist with water
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Keeping a new recycled asphalt driveway moist with water is crucial during the initial curing process to ensure proper compaction and durability of the surface. Here are some key steps and considerations for keeping your new driveway moist:

Initial Watering: Immediately after installation, lightly water the entire surface of the recycled asphalt driveway. This helps to settle the material and removes air gaps, ensuring a more compact and stable base.

Regular Watering: During the first few days after installation, water the driveway regularly, especially in dry weather conditions. Aim to keep the surface consistently moist but not overly saturated.

Moisture Absorption: Recycled asphalt tends to absorb moisture from the environment. By watering the driveway, you help maintain the optimal moisture content necessary for effective compaction and bonding of the asphalt particles.

Avoid Overwatering: While it's important to keep the driveway moist, avoid overwatering, which can lead to puddling, runoff, or erosion of the surface. Monitor the driveway's moisture level and adjust watering frequency as needed.

Time Frame: Continue regular watering for at least the first week after installation, or as recommended by your contractor. The curing time may vary depending on weather conditions and the specific asphalt mix used.

Curing Process: Properly watering the driveway during the curing process promotes a stronger and more durable surface. It helps prevent cracking, settling, and premature wear of the asphalt.

Sealcoating: Consider applying a sealcoat to the driveway once it has fully cured. Sealcoating helps protect the surface from UV rays, water damage, and oil spills, prolonging its lifespan.

By following these guidelines and keeping your new recycled asphalt driveway adequately moist with water during the initial curing period, you can contribute to its long-term durability and performance. Always consult with your contractor for specific recommendations tailored to your driveway project and local weather conditions.
Water recycled asphalt millings when rolling
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When rolling recycled asphalt millings (also known as RAP, or Recycled Asphalt Pavement), watering can be an essential step to achieve proper compaction and ensure a durable final surface. Here’s how watering during rolling can benefit the process:

Dust Control: Water helps to suppress dust emissions from the recycled asphalt millings, creating a safer working environment and reducing airborne particles.

Moisture Content: Adequate moisture content is critical for achieving optimal compaction. Watering the millings before and during rolling helps to distribute moisture evenly throughout the material, making it more pliable and easier to compact.

Improved Compaction: Moisture acts as a binding agent, helping the particles within the recycled asphalt to adhere to each other more effectively during compaction. This results in a denser, more stable base or surface.

Prevents Material Stickiness: Watering also helps to reduce the stickiness of the recycled asphalt millings, which can improve the handling and rolling process.

Environmental Considerations: It’s important to balance the amount of water used to avoid over-saturation, which can lead to runoff and potential erosion issues. Proper water management ensures effective compaction without compromising surrounding environmental conditions.

Best Practices for Watering Recycled Asphalt Millings:

Uniform Application: Ensure water is applied evenly across the surface of the millings using appropriate spraying equipment or watering trucks.

Timing: Watering should be done just before rolling begins and periodically during the compaction process to maintain optimal moisture levels.

Monitoring: Regularly check the moisture content of the millings to adjust watering practices as needed, especially in dry or hot weather conditions.

Compaction Sequence: Use a heavy roller (e.g., steel drum roller) to achieve initial compaction, followed by a pneumatic roller to further densify and smooth the surface.

By following these practices, watering recycled asphalt millings during rolling helps ensure a well-compacted and stable surface that meets the desired specifications for roadways, driveways, or other paved areas.


You
calcium chloride interaction with recycled asphalt millings
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ChatGPT
Calcium chloride can be used as a dust suppressant and to improve compaction when working with recycled asphalt millings. Here are some key interactions and considerations:

Dust Control: Calcium chloride is often used to mitigate dust emissions from recycled asphalt millings. When applied, it attracts moisture from the air, creating a solution that binds fine particles together and prevents them from becoming airborne.

Moisture Content: Calcium chloride can affect the moisture content of the recycled asphalt millings. By attracting moisture, it can help achieve better compaction during road construction or driveway installation. Proper moisture content is crucial for achieving optimal compaction and long-term durability.

Compaction: The interaction between calcium chloride and recycled asphalt millings can enhance the compaction process. As moisture is absorbed and distributed more evenly within the material, it improves the ability to achieve a dense and stable base or surface.

Application: Calcium chloride is typically applied as a liquid solution sprayed directly onto the surface of the recycled asphalt millings. The application rate depends on factors such as the desired level of dust control, moisture conditions, and environmental considerations.

Environmental Impact: While calcium chloride is effective for dust control and compaction, it's important to consider potential environmental impacts. Proper application techniques and adherence to environmental regulations are essential to minimize any adverse effects on surrounding vegetation, water sources, and wildlife.

Longevity: The effectiveness of calcium chloride treatment can vary based on environmental conditions, traffic load, and maintenance practices. Periodic reapplication may be necessary to maintain desired levels of dust suppression and compaction enhancement over time.

Before using calcium chloride or any chemical treatments with recycled asphalt millings, it's advisable to consult with professionals or manufacturers to ensure proper application techniques and compatibility with specific project requirements. Additionally, adherence to local regulations and environmental guidelines is crucial to ensure responsible use and minimize potential environmental impact.


You
I like this resource. Thanks @Richard.

 
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Post by waytomany?s » Wed. Jul. 03, 2024 7:27 am

I agree, excellent resource.


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