Add more Solar Panels to existing Grid Tied System.

 
waytomany?s
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Post by waytomany?s » Wed. May. 01, 2024 12:10 pm

ColdHouse wrote:
Wed. May. 01, 2024 8:57 am
Yes and were you not the person asking Hooty to explain in detail how he assembled and built his batteries? It seemed in that thread that you were interested in how to DIY your own Solar and Battery.

Now you suggest calling the original installer.

That is okay. This will be an interesting thread. It will end up being a solar with battery and grid tied system.
The thing about this array is it will be used completely each day so that as much as possible from my other already installed system can go back to the grid for my off season months.

I would be interested in hearing about some of your adventurous, innovative projects that you have done or are presently doing. Please start a thread and share with us the details of your ingenuity.
Touchy much? It's interesting that you are willing to go against your own beliefs, and rather quickly at that. If you are falling short of generated power and it's such a good investment of 9-10% why would you not just add enough panels at a better angle than the roof panels? I mean, if you are just looking for another project because you're bored, have at it. I'm not convinced on the ROI of the battery bank myself. I like the idea of the lifepo battery bank, but I don't want to loose interior space for them. And to loose more power by warming them.


 
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Post by ColdHouse » Wed. May. 01, 2024 1:06 pm

What do you think the topic is about?
It is about adding another set of panels. And, I think it is a good investment.
How exactly am I going against my own beliefs?

 
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Post by waytomany?s » Wed. May. 01, 2024 1:43 pm

ColdHouse wrote:
Wed. May. 01, 2024 1:06 pm
What do you think the topic is about?
It is about adding another set of panels. And, I think it is a good investment.
How exactly am I going against my own beliefs? Adding panels with battery backup. Hell, you convinced me it wasn't necessary.
The question about investment was regarding the battery backup portion. Does a battery bank give you a ROI?

 
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Post by ColdHouse » Wed. May. 01, 2024 1:46 pm

waytomany?s wrote:
Wed. May. 01, 2024 1:43 pm
The question about investment was regarding the battery backup portion. Does a battery bank give you a ROI?
It seems like with these grid tied inverters, I wouldn't even need a battery. I already have a bidirectional meter and power from the original system goes to the grid. So I would think that with the grid tied inverter on the new array that would shut down the new array if the grid went down but send all the power generated to the main panel for immediate use or get sent to the grid.
Posted on previous page. I would rather not have a battery. Bad ROI with battery.

 
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Post by waytomany?s » Wed. May. 01, 2024 1:50 pm

ColdHouse wrote:
Wed. May. 01, 2024 8:57 am
Yes and were you not the person asking Hooty to explain in detail how he assembled and built his batteries? It seemed in that thread that you were interested in how to DIY your own Solar and Battery. Nope, not interested in solar.

Now you suggest calling the original installer. Yes, they are already familiar with your setup, AND you will have a guarantee if professionally done. Get an estimate, you don't have to commit.

That is okay. This will be an interesting thread. It will end up being a solar with battery and grid tied system.
The thing about this array is it will be used completely each day so that as much as possible from my other already installed system can go back to the grid for my off season months.

I would be interested in hearing about some of your adventurous, innovative projects that you have done or are presently doing. Please start a thread and share with us the details of your ingenuity. Why? I'm no gasconader.

 
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Post by nut » Wed. May. 01, 2024 2:44 pm

gasconader
I had to look that one up :)

 
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Post by waytomany?s » Wed. May. 01, 2024 2:48 pm

nut wrote:
Wed. May. 01, 2024 2:44 pm
gasconader
I had to look that one up :)
I love my word of the day calendar. :D


 
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Post by Hootyburra » Wed. May. 01, 2024 7:16 pm

ColdHouse wrote:
Wed. May. 01, 2024 8:49 am
So if I get about 5-6kw panels.
Figure my home average is 1.5kwh per hour x 6 hours of sunshine = 9kwh consumed directly on average from solar panels.
Sunniest day produce 93kwh with (40) 400 watt panels = average 2.35 maximum production on sunniest day per panel.
If I install additional (14) 400 watt panels the most I would get is 32.55 kwh per day on sunniest day.
If I consume 9kwh from 32.55 the largest battery bank I would need is 23.55 but if you can only discharge the battery 80% I would need about a 30kwh battery maximum to not waste any energy generated from the new array.
Install in a grid tie inverter like this one: https://signaturesolar.com/growatt-120-240v-6kw-g ... -inverter/

Then I have panels that produce electricity and go directly to the battery which goes directly to the grid tie inverter that shuts down when the grid goes down. All my energy is used in the home while the grid is up.

What you think hooty?

It seems like with these grid tied inverters, I wouldn't even need a battery. I already have a bidirectional meter and power from the original system goes to the grid. So I would think that with the grid tied inverter on the new array that would shut down the new array if the grid went down but send all the power generated to the main panel for immediate use or get sent to the grid.
An inverter like that will backfeed to the grid and shutdown in the event of a grid outage. You need a hybrid capable of AC coupling.
Do you have a limit on how much power your can export per your interconnect agreement?

I personally will not spend a penny with SS after seeing the owners behavior on the other forum along with the constant repeat issues....
Check out altE solar, they are up your way somewhere. Current Connected and NAZ Solar also get my votes.

I'm almost certain you can cycle lead acid 50% without abnormal degradation.

You already have a generator transfer switch, correct?
Simplest / easiest solution would be a hybrid AIO fed from the new array backed up with a small battery bank to give you some backup power. Depending what you chose you could add more panels and batteries down the road.

I've seen countless posts on the other forum with people running on grid and off grid systems.

 
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Post by Hootyburra » Wed. May. 01, 2024 7:23 pm

waytomany?s wrote:
Wed. May. 01, 2024 1:43 pm
The question about investment was regarding the battery backup portion. Does a battery bank give you a ROI?
Yes, especially if you have peak and off peak rates. You can utilize the battery bank to keep you "off grid" during peak rates and transfer back to grid during off peak rates.
You are using the battery as your power plant, any battery used is money saved not buying energy from the grid.
For me it's not really about the ROI (ok it is, I use way more power now than when I used the grid) ; it's about the piece of mind and control. Grid goes down, I don't know, my stove stays lit, my AC keeps working, my beef stays frozen, my well keeps pumping, my showers stay hot, the EV I eventually buy stays charged, beer stays cold, ice balls for the bourbon whiskey glass stay frozen, shop equipment keeps working... You get the idea.

 
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Post by warminmn » Wed. May. 01, 2024 9:00 pm

Hootyburra wrote:
Wed. May. 01, 2024 7:23 pm
beer stays cold, ice balls for the bourbon whiskey glass stay frozen,
Sold! :lol:

 
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Post by ColdHouse » Thu. May. 02, 2024 5:51 am


 
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Post by ColdHouse » Sat. May. 04, 2024 6:21 am

I have been under the impression that lead acid batteries are old school, outdated technology. They are heavy, require monitoring and maintenance, take up a lot of space, and are expensive. Am I wrong? If I want batteries that would be outside, are lead acid batteries my best option? In the long run, is it more efficient and less expensive to use different technology and pay to heat the battery compartment with some of the generated electricity?

I have watched different video's and I find it strange that the DIY guy in a no permit scenario can just throw up panels any and everywhere. Heck they hang them vertical on the side of a barn, or just slant them against and old pallet on the ground or whatever. I can understand if you want them on your roof, somebody would need to determine the structure can hold the weight and that the roof can be accessed in the event of a fire and... Then when they discuss ground mounts, they talk about pouring piers and going below the frost line and... To me that seems excessive. Seriously, you have a few 50 pound panels and some racking a few feet off the ground, So what if the structure failed. See this is where when a city or permits get involved the price gets pretty excessive. You could probably put panels on your storage shed roof that sits on top of a couple of cinder blocks, but if you want a ground mount system, you need piers poured? Heck I would think you could build a gazebo without a roof and use solar panels as shade.

 
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Post by nut » Sat. May. 04, 2024 8:36 am

Is Ct. making it hard? Be thankful you don't live in L.A. I can see going below frost. Heaving could change your orientation over many freeze thaw cycles.

 
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Post by waytomany?s » Sat. May. 04, 2024 9:08 am

Lead acid batts will last 4-7 years with proper maintenance. With a quality brand. Last we purchased at work were interstate 6v. $130 with exchange.

 
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Post by Sunny Boy » Sat. May. 04, 2024 9:58 am

waytomany?s wrote:
Sat. May. 04, 2024 9:08 am
Lead acid batts will last 4-7 years with proper maintenance. With a quality brand. Last we purchased at work were interstate 6v. $130 with exchange.
The group 4 Interstate 6 volt will last almost twice that for only 1/3 more of that price. I use the 4-xhd 1000cca in customer's antique cars. Coat the cleaned terminals with Gardner-Bender Ox-Gard electrician's anti-corrosion paste and they never need cleaning for the life of the battery.

Paul

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