Going Solar

 
Hootyburra
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Post by Hootyburra » Tue. Jun. 04, 2024 9:24 pm

ColdHouse wrote:
Sat. Jun. 01, 2024 6:32 am
So as you can see from the above post, I get paid full retail for every kwh sent to the grid. Full retail is everything it costs including supply, delivery... all fees.

In addition to that, over and above that, I get quarterly payment for REC credit and Economically Distressed Adder.
These incentive credits are for 20 years and are for every kwh produced! Even those that I consume. So I get $0.0443 or 4.443 cents for every kwh my solar system generates for 20 years.
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I have not had the system for an entire year yet but my best guess is that it will have produced 14,000kwh over a 12 month period. I think last summer was unseasonably rainy/overcast.
Anyway when considering 14,000 x $0.0443=$620.20 if you divide that by the current rate, that incentive gives me enough cash to purchase 2297kwh at the current rate to supplement my shortfall. So if I produce 14,000 and can purchase 2297 from the incentives that gets me to 16,300.
Maybe tweaking consumption a little bit more will get us to net zero.
I must be missing something, your supply charge / KWh is greater than what your getting paid for your export from what I'm seeing in your posts.

My all in cost is somewhere around 15 cents / KWh and I've produced over 5MWh with the new inverter since I've installed it, I've saved over $750 or paid for more than 3/4 the cost of the inverter pending how you look at it.

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ColdHouse
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Post by ColdHouse » Wed. Jun. 26, 2024 6:42 am

Last year was the 4th wettest/most rain in history in my area.
This year has been pretty pleasant to this point. There are 5 Sun days left in June. I never produced 100 kWh in a day off my system. I think the highest was 94 or 95. Definitely above 90 and below 100 on the best days. So if the next 5 days are perfect I will still fall short of 8kWh for the first 6 months of the year. 90kWh and above days are rare.
Regardless, I have a home that is not optimally positioned with the sun. I have fixed solar panels on my roof. I have a huge hill behind my home that blocks the sun for many hours during the winter. The first 6 months of this year, I will produce almost 8kWh from a 16kWh system in the not so Solar friendly town of Bristol CT.
I guess December 31 I can provide the entire years production. I have a lifetime option but that is not even close to real because it starts the day the panels were installed. It shows production for a couple of days after installation and then nothing until months later after authorization to operate was granted. However it shows consumption for that entire time. So for months from February until June 19, 2023 there is consumption but only couple days production

So the most accurate continuous information I can provide on my Solar system is from Jan 1, 2024 until today. As mentioned at the end of the year I can show the entire year.

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franpipeman
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Post by franpipeman » Wed. Jun. 26, 2024 8:42 am

my son lives in ct The state is very friendly for solar power . Good rebates and tax credits my son makes over a 100 kwh per day even during february. We self installed as thats are business model for most thing . My sons system is 10 years old with two adds ons s. It a wonderful method photovoltaic , mankinds version of photosyntheses


 
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warminmn
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Post by warminmn » Wed. Jun. 26, 2024 8:49 am

I was just going to ask why CT is not solar friendly and still will? There are people in AK having good results minus the almost zero sun months.

 
ColdHouse
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Post by ColdHouse » Wed. Jun. 26, 2024 9:52 am

warminmn wrote:
Wed. Jun. 26, 2024 8:49 am
I was just going to ask why CT is not solar friendly and still will? There are people in AK having good results minus the almost zero sun months.
There are sights you can go and put in your zip code and see how many sun hours you get per year. If I remember right my area is 1134 or something like that. If you do that in Arizona or Utah you have much more sun. Colorado boasts 300 days of sunshine per year. Connecticut has good tax incentives but many overcast days.

 
ColdHouse
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Post by ColdHouse » Wed. Jun. 26, 2024 9:54 am

franpipeman wrote:
Wed. Jun. 26, 2024 8:42 am
my son lives in ct The state is very friendly for solar power . Good rebates and tax credits my son makes over a 100 kwh per day even during february. We self installed as thats are business model for most thing . My sons system is 10 years old with two adds ons s. It a wonderful method photovoltaic , mankinds version of photosyntheses
Not dusputing. I have a neighbor that has a daughter in the same town and she has a 14kw system same panels that produces more than I do. Her house is oriented better and she doesn't have the hill. My best day in December was something like 13kWh production.


 
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BigBarney
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Post by BigBarney » Wed. Jun. 26, 2024 12:42 pm

Here's where I live in the dark only 159 sunny days...So about 200 cloudy days..

Wa barely see the sun in Dec-Mar....And get a lot of snow 127" ave...

Ripley, NY has a humid continental climate with hot summers and cold winters. Summers in Ripley are typically warm and sunny, with temperatures reaching into the high 80s. Winters can be cold and snowy, often dropping below freezing at night. The area sees an average of 33 inches of rain each year, which helps to keep it lush and green throughout the year. Summer storms can bring heavy rains as well as thunderstorms, while winter can bring gusty winds and snowfall. Ripley is also known for its beautiful fall foliage that peaks in October.

Ripley, New York gets 47 inches of rain, on average, per year. The US average is 38 inches of rain per year.

Ripley averages 127 inches of snow per year. The US average is 28 inches of snow per year.

On average, there are 159 sunny days per year in Ripley. The US average is 205 sunny days.

Ripley gets some kind of precipitation, on average, 154 days per year. Precipitation is rain, snow, sleet, or hail that falls to the ground. In order for precipitation to be counted you have to get at least .01 inches on the ground to measure.

BigBarney

 
ColdHouse
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Post by ColdHouse » Fri. Jun. 28, 2024 9:27 pm


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