Air in well water - gurgling in pressure tank

 
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Rob R.
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Post by Rob R. » Thu. May. 23, 2024 10:02 am

I have a nice sediment filter, but it is downstream of the pressure tank.


 
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Post by hotblast1357 » Thu. May. 23, 2024 7:52 pm

Glad to hear it’s working good. It’s still in the back of my brain, or just installing a tank to make cycle longer.

 
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Post by Rob R. » Thu. May. 23, 2024 8:26 pm

The easy part is done. I decided to put the tank on top of the valve. Requires less pipe that way and should prevent sediment from collecting in the tank.

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Post by Dave 1234 » Thu. May. 23, 2024 9:09 pm

Rob , I got so disgusted with the price and lifespan of the new pressure tanks. My new one is an old SS beer keg . They are 316 stainless , and work great for a domestic water pressure tank . Pretty easy to find on CL .

 
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Post by Rob R. » Fri. May. 24, 2024 6:03 am

Part of the advantage of using the Cycle Stop valve is you can use a very small tank. The new tank I got has a 7 year warranty. Hopefully it lasts a long time.

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Post by ColdHouse » Fri. May. 24, 2024 6:31 am

I would be interested in the consolidated version of your upgrades and the logic behind the parts you installed.
I am late to this thread.
I can't help but wonder if you couldn't just use one of those Stainless kegs as a sediment trap before entering into your equipment. Sediment tends to be heavier and if your water entered a keg and then went into your system, it seems that all you would have to do is shut off your water and remove sediment from the keg.

I am truly interested because I have well water and am always interested in making things better.

 
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Post by Dave 1234 » Fri. May. 24, 2024 8:19 am

CH , The keg is mounted , tap down with a 1'' NPT copper adapter soldered into the opening . A snifter valve lets you pressurize the tank for the expansion effect .


 
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Post by ColdHouse » Fri. May. 24, 2024 8:58 am

Dave 1234 wrote:
Fri. May. 24, 2024 8:19 am
CH , The keg is mounted , tap down with a 1'' NPT copper adapter soldered into the opening . A snifter valve lets you pressurize the tank for the expansion effect .
Okay well I was simply brainstorming that if there were a keg or some container that the water went into before it went into the important stuff, it would filter out sediment or at least would think it would.

 
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Post by Rob R. » Fri. May. 24, 2024 9:23 am

ColdHouse wrote:
Fri. May. 24, 2024 6:31 am
I would be interested in the consolidated version of your upgrades and the logic behind the parts you installed.
I am late to this thread.
I can't help but wonder if you couldn't just use one of those Stainless kegs as a sediment trap before entering into your equipment. Sediment tends to be heavier and if your water entered a keg and then went into your system, it seems that all you would have to do is shut off your water and remove sediment from the keg.

I am truly interested because I have well water and am always interested in making things better.
I will explain/show how it works once the install is complete. The sediment in my water is very fine, but also very abrasive. It ruined the seals in the control heads on my water treatment system - which is why I installed a huge cartridge filter between the pressure tank and the water treatment system. I have had no issues since installing the cartridge filter, but I do notice the additional pressure drop when the pump is getting close to kicking on.

 
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Post by ColdHouse » Fri. May. 24, 2024 9:58 am

I was thinking the other day that even considering the issues of drilling and maintaining a well, I wouldn't want city water. I love my well water! Water is the most essential element of life and I get mine right from the source! Not many things in life that can be said about.

 
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Post by Rob R. » Sat. May. 25, 2024 12:47 pm

The install went well.


 
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Post by ColdHouse » Sat. May. 25, 2024 4:23 pm

Rob R. wrote:
Sat. May. 25, 2024 12:47 pm
The install went well.

Did you always have your system set at 60psi?
I remember reading that if you system was set up for 20/40 that it isn't wise to increase it. I forget all the reasons but I think it had something to do with stress on the pipes and other appliances like boiler and such that might be hooked to it. My house is presently set at 20/40. I would like more pressure.

Nice clean install!

What did that set up cost you?

 
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Post by Rob R. » Sun. May. 26, 2024 6:42 am

ColdHouse wrote:
Sat. May. 25, 2024 4:23 pm
Did you always have your system set at 60psi?
I remember reading that if you system was set up for 20/40 that it isn't wise to increase it. I forget all the reasons but I think it had something to do with stress on the pipes and other appliances like boiler and such that might be hooked to it. My house is presently set at 20/40. I would like more pressure.

Nice clean install!

What did that set up cost you?
When I moved in 15 years ago the well used a 30/50 switch. I adjusted it to 40/60 for improved pressure. The specification and condition of the piping determines what pressure you can run, not what pressure has been used before. I had 50 year old copper and galvanized piping that we replaced as part of a remodel, but there were no leaks even from the oldest pipes. I wouldn't hesitate to bump yours up to the higher pressure setting, but note you will also need to adjust the air pressure in the tank to 38 psi (this is done with no water pressure in the system.

The cycle stop valve works by throttling the output of the pump, this creates higher pressure between the valve and the pump. How high the pressure gets is determined by the model pump you have, depth, etc. It can easily be over 75 psi, so it is important to make sure the pipe between the valve and the pump can tolerate the higher pressure. In most cases this isn't an issue, but it should be checked.

The new setup cost me about $450, not allowing for a few fittings that I already had on hand. A replacement tank like the one I had would have been about the same cost.

My dad wants me to install a similar setup in his house this summer and I plan to buy the side-kick kit (link below).

https://cyclestopvalves.com/collections/frontpage ... e-kick-kit

 
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Post by waytomany?s » Sun. May. 26, 2024 8:25 am

What is the purpose of the cycle stop?

 
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Post by Rob R. » Sun. May. 26, 2024 8:55 am

waytomany?s wrote:
Sun. May. 26, 2024 8:25 am
What is the purpose of the cycle stop?
It keeps your pump cycles manageable without needing a large tank, and your water pressure is more consistent.


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