Where have all the horse buggies gone???

 
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BigBarney
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Post by BigBarney » Wed. May. 22, 2024 11:50 am

Where oh where have they gone... I won't be here long enough to see it...

The Detroit electric was one of many in 1900.. Baker electric too...



The only thing they lacked were good batteries... Now we have them ...

So lets go and enjoy a renewable future without the pollution...

Power the vehicle at home if you can or just buy renewable energy...

See the future and come to it the road is long...

BigBarney


 
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Sunny Boy
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Post by Sunny Boy » Wed. May. 22, 2024 12:40 pm

They mostly went to scrap, or a very limited few to collectors that don't use them on antique car tours - like gas powered vehicles - because electrics were very limited and impractical. Gasoline powered vehicles drove them out of business in very short time for reasons you seem to not want to acknowledge.

Paul

 
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Post by freetown fred » Wed. May. 22, 2024 2:40 pm

Right here in Freetown!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! active all.:)

 
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BigBarney
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Post by BigBarney » Wed. May. 22, 2024 3:19 pm

Freddy You keeping the livestock alive..And the buggies rolling with hp...

BigBarney

 
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BigBarney
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Post by BigBarney » Wed. May. 22, 2024 3:20 pm

You need to remember that a lot of iron went to scrap in 2 world wars..

BigBarney

 
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Post by Sunny Boy » Thu. May. 23, 2024 10:23 am

BigBarney wrote:
Wed. May. 22, 2024 3:20 pm
You need to remember that a lot of iron went to scrap in 2 world wars..

BigBarney
True.

But even mergers could not save the Baker Motor Company. It was out of business well before we entered WWI. Guess why.

There were far fewer electrics to go for war scrap drives because sales were so low. Like today's electrics, they were an expensive, impractical, novelty for the wealthy.

You're much more likely to find White and Stanley steam cars surviving today, which also were put out of business by thousands of makes of more practical gasoline autos.

Paul

 
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Post by hank2 » Fri. May. 24, 2024 12:49 am

freetown fred wrote:
Wed. May. 22, 2024 2:40 pm
Right here in Freetown!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! active all.:)
Good many in my hood as well. Old order Mennonites. The number of horse drawn buggies dropped way off for a few years. They're back in a big way over the last year or two. Mostly on Sunday morning and evening. One gal stopped her rig to chat at my house last year and she had about 20, 4 year olds on the back of an extended diamond plate wagon. Maybe bible school or something?


 
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Post by hank2 » Fri. May. 24, 2024 1:01 am

In the 1950's and 1960's my family often visited a great Aunt and Uncle. They lived in a large apartment above a carriage house, owned by another great Uncle. Block long property. The owner was a serious brass era car collector and restorer. He kept the top 6 models in that carriage house and they seemed to often rotate models. Stanley Steamer, very early Olds, etc., etc. Mostly open touring cars. One of the cars was a large electric car which I can't seem to remember the name of. Seems it was a fairly well known make.

 
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BigBarney
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Post by BigBarney » Fri. May. 24, 2024 1:54 am

Detroit Electric and Baker were common electric cars...

But there were many more with smaller sales...

BigBarney

 
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Post by ColdHouse » Fri. May. 24, 2024 6:02 am

If electric vehicles are so ineffective or can't move heavy loads, why so many electric golf carts and forklifts?

 
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Post by Sunny Boy » Fri. May. 24, 2024 10:09 am

ColdHouse wrote:
Fri. May. 24, 2024 6:02 am
If electric vehicles are so ineffective or can't move heavy loads, why so many electric golf carts and forklifts?
Electric golf carts are easier to learn to drive and they are only used for short durations. When longer distances and times are needed, such as for farming/hunting then gas engines are the choice.

Electric forklifts are often used indoors where exhaust would be a problem. I used a Clark electric for 9 years when working in a large museum storage area. Can't do all-day work like the gas-powered ones. Only good for about 1-2 hours use, then back on the charger for a day.

Paul

 
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Post by BigBarney » Fri. May. 24, 2024 3:50 pm

What % of driving is more than 600 miles per day??

Ave per AAA is 45 miles ... EV's can go 3 to 6 days on one charge...

This is a useless argument.. Match the equipment to the job...

Do you need an 18 wheeler to deliver one ton of coal ?

Many small trucks fit the bill perfectly...

BigBarney

 
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Post by Sunny Boy » Fri. May. 24, 2024 4:29 pm

BigBarney wrote:
Fri. May. 24, 2024 1:54 am
Detroit Electric and Baker were common electric cars...

But there were many more with smaller sales...

BigBarney
Not that common and all didn't last long.

Detroit Electric lasted the longest - just over 30 years but was only able to sell a total of about 13,000 cars in that time. Many auto companies at that time sold more gas-powered cars than that in just one year.

13K total production run is a very small production when you consider that just one company, Ford sold over 15 million model Ts in less than 30 years and then just under 5 million Modal As in less than 5 years - 35 million gas powered cars just from one of thousands of pre-WWII auto makers.

As per the Society of Automotive Historians, there have been over 5000 different makes of autos around the world. Only an extremely tiny fraction of them were electric powered.

Gas powered vehicles were the king of the road from the earliest days,... and still are.

Paul

 
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Post by ColdHouse » Fri. May. 24, 2024 4:40 pm

Sunny Boy wrote:
Fri. May. 24, 2024 4:29 pm
Not that common and all didn't last long.

Detroit Electric lasted the longest - just over 30 years but was only able to sell a total of about 13,000 cars in that time. Many auto companies at that time sold more gas-powered cars than that in just one year.

13K total production run is a very small production when you consider that just one company, Ford sold over 15 million model Ts in less than 30 years and then just under 5 million Modal As in less than 5 years - 35 million gas powered cars just from one of thousands of pre-WWII auto makers.

As per the Society of Automotive Historians, there have been over 5000 different makes of autos around the world. Only an extremely tiny fraction of them were electric powered.

Gas powered vehicles were the king of the road from the earliest days,... and still are.

Paul
Things change and products evolve.

 
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Post by ColdHouse » Fri. May. 24, 2024 4:48 pm

FORKLIFT BATTERY CHARGING OPTIONS
Fast or opportunity charging is ideal for companies with multi-shift operations. While conventional battery charging gives the forklift operator 8 hours of run-time, it then requires 8 hours of charging time and another 8 hours to cool before it can be used again. To not experience downtime, additional batteries must be purchased for each shift.
https://www.prolifttoyota.com/blog/forklift-batte ... -charging/


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