Milling flour

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tcalo
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Post by tcalo » Mon. Mar. 04, 2024 4:56 pm

Recently I've been interested in milling my own flour. I've read fresh milled flour is much healthier. Any members dabble in this area? I did notice that the price of wheat berries is more than commercially milled flour. You would think it would be cheaper for the raw material! A good mill is also very expensive. I believe most of the wheat grown is contracted to be sold to commercial mills. I guess like anything else, the niche market has a higher price tag to play!!

 
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Retro_Origin
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Post by Retro_Origin » Mon. Mar. 04, 2024 6:22 pm

My mom always used her vitamix with a special dry mix container and blade set to grind her flour. I cannot vouch for the difference between that and an actual berry specific mill but she always had rave reviews on her breads, my wife has the same setup and I think it tastes good

 
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BigBarney
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Post by BigBarney » Mon. Mar. 04, 2024 7:32 pm

If you want organic flour it may be in short supply..

"In the 2023/24 marketing year, Russia was the leading exporter of wheat, flour, and wheat products worldwide. Russia exported about 51 million metric tons that year. The European Union came in second, with 36.5 million metric tons of exports.Jan 30, 2024"

https://www.statista.com/statistics/190429/princi ... %20exports.

Russia is a major exporter...

BigBarney


 
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warminmn
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Post by warminmn » Mon. Mar. 04, 2024 7:54 pm

I would maybe look on Lehmans site or elsewhere to see if they have any grain that you like, then look for it cheaper somewhere else. Amish stores sell different flours here but unsure if any is not ground yet. I always thought bread made real chunky, fresh ground like your talking would be delicious. Good luck

 
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Post by waytomany?s » Mon. Mar. 04, 2024 9:08 pm

I was at a feed store at the beginning of COVID and some Bosnians were buying 50# bags of oats and were going to do the mylar bag pepper style thing. I guess depending on what you need/want, that could be an outlet to check.

 
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Post by carlherrnstein » Sun. Mar. 17, 2024 11:45 pm

tcalo wrote:
Mon. Mar. 04, 2024 4:56 pm
Recently I've been interested in milling my own flour. I've read fresh milled flour is much healthier. Any members dabble in this area? I did notice that the price of wheat berries is more than commercially milled flour. You would think it would be cheaper for the raw material! A good mill is also very expensive. I believe most of the wheat grown is contracted to be sold to commercial mills. I guess like anything else, the niche market has a higher price tag to play!!
When I was a young kid mom milled flour in a blender, the wheat was grown on the family farm. I think the wheat was a type that is used to make crackers an it didn't make good bread, it was very dense.

Fresh milled flour goes rancid an should be kept in the freezer. There's oils in the germ that oxidize. They remove all of the germ and bran from store bought flour so it keeps better.

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