Premier 1 Pig Fencing

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ASea
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Post by ASea » Tue. Jan. 23, 2024 5:47 pm

I'm considering raising two pigs this year and looking at the Premier 1 Pig Fence and Solar charger. Has anyone used their products for pigs? I've had great luck with the poultry netting. https://www.premier1supplies.com/p/hognet-24-inch ... 98QAvD_BwE

 
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warminmn
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Post by warminmn » Tue. Jan. 23, 2024 6:44 pm

Best fence I ever made for pigs was made with cattle panels buried a few inches in the ground, then on inside had a good brand of barbed wire stapled to wood posts and connected to the steel posts near the bottom and then put rings in all their noses. sometimes have to ring them more than once to keep them from digging.

I didnt use electric on that pen. it was my winter pen for sows so i needed the height. It was used in the summer too but built to handle the winters. I think electric fence on the inside may have been just as good as the barbed wire. Once the ground froze they couldnt dig out of course. Its possible I put some chicken wire on the inside too, for smaller pigs. I did that sometimes on other pens.

I think if it saved money pig panels would work to replace the cattle panels with a few rows of electric above that. Even in the long snowy winters i never chased a pig.

the fence linked too may work fine but I'd spend money on panels instead. They will last longer. Here I am 35 years later still using those panels for other things as they last. Maybe new ones arent as good, i dont know. But up to you what to spend money on.

 
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ASea
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Post by ASea » Tue. Jan. 23, 2024 7:34 pm

Thanks, I like the idea of the netting and being able to move them around the property. I have allot of areas I need cleared of overgrowth.

 
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Post by waytomany?s » Tue. Jan. 23, 2024 8:44 pm

ASea wrote:
Tue. Jan. 23, 2024 7:34 pm
Thanks, I like the idea of the netting and being able to move them around the property. I have allot of areas I need cleared of overgrowth.
I wouldn't. Chasing them is fun the first time. Once their over a hundred pounds it's easier to just shoot them and save yourself the aggravation. Do you have close neighbors? Have you raised them before? I'm not arguing against raising them, a permanent pen is way easier.


 
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warminmn
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Post by warminmn » Tue. Jan. 23, 2024 10:09 pm

Dont get Duroc's. You have to try pushing them the opposite direction then you want them to go... a stubborn breed. I was lucky that I only ever had a small breakout in a bigger pasture and got them right back in. Chasing pigs is not fun. Pretty much have to drag them if you can catch them.

Land to clear, goats might be better but only if you can stand having them around. Pigs tear things up sometimes and wont eat a lot of different things. But great if you have snakes there as they eat them all. Cant beat the bacon and ham from them raised on pasture.

I always wanted to build a portable fence on wheels that could be dropped down. Best of luck with whatever you end out doing,

 
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Post by waytomany?s » Wed. Jan. 24, 2024 8:33 am

You don't need a huge spot either. The last set I raised was in a 10x12 horse stall. They had plenty of room till they were almost ready to slaughter. Curious your experience, I don't want to tell you what to do if you already know. I know how irritating it is to have someone blather on when you already know. I've been married for 22 years. :D

 
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Post by LDPosse » Wed. Jan. 24, 2024 6:24 pm

We bought four 164’ rolls of the pig fencing back in 2017. Two of the rolls are still in the packaging, we haven’t used them.

We used it in the summer of 2017 for some Duroc/Spot/Yorkshire crosses we raised. No one escaped, but we had to be pretty vigilant about any weeds growing on it. We used the Premier1 Intellishock 10, which put out a decent jolt, but it discharged my group 24 deep cycles in less than a week with a heavy weed load and rain. The intellishock 10 only lasted 3 years, it developed an internal short and got sent away for scrap.

We ended up building a 96’x96’ hog panel pen with 2 strands of electric, at 6” and 18”

Starting in 2022, we started raising Meishan pigs, which are extremely docile and hate getting shocked. We have our breeding stock confined with it, and that has worked well.

I will say that I would recommend an AC fence charger over solar, or a battery/solar unit with a big panel. I have a 15 mile AC charger on a single 164’ piece of it, and that’s about the most that I am comfortable with.

 
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ASea
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Post by ASea » Wed. Jan. 24, 2024 10:15 pm

waytomany?s wrote:
Tue. Jan. 23, 2024 8:44 pm
I wouldn't. Chasing them is fun the first time. Once their over a hundred pounds it's easier to just shoot them and save yourself the aggravation. Do you have close neighbors? Have you raised them before? I'm not arguing against raising them, a permanent pen is way easier.
Neighbors are close but not too close. I haven't raised them before. I have helped with a friend's pigs. Plan is to raise 2-3. I want to make sure the wife is on board as I work 24hr shifts.


 
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ASea
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Post by ASea » Wed. Jan. 24, 2024 10:17 pm

waytomany?s wrote:
Wed. Jan. 24, 2024 8:33 am
You don't need a huge spot either. The last set I raised was in a 10x12 horse stall. They had plenty of room till they were almost ready to slaughter. Curious your experience, I don't want to tell you what to do if you already know. I know how irritating it is to have someone blather on when you already know. I've been married for 22 years. :D
I have experience raising chickens,turkeys, and have done a lot with gardens. Very little pig experience. This will be 23years married for us. LOL

 
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Post by waytomany?s » Thu. Jan. 25, 2024 7:30 am

ASea wrote:
Wed. Jan. 24, 2024 10:17 pm
I have experience raising chickens,turkeys, and have done a lot with gardens. Very little pig experience. This will be 23years married for us. LOL
The feeder needs to be accessible from outside the pen. Waterer as well. They are ok when little and the wife and kids will think it's funny when they chew on your boots. When they get bigger and rub on you or come running and sideswipe your legs, it won't be as funny. You really need to be in the pen every day to scratch them, pet them, etc when they are young.

 
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Post by waytomany?s » Thu. Jan. 25, 2024 8:30 am

Pay attention to any aggression. Not much you can do to change it but it's good to be prepared. Always carry an old tool handle or some such when they are getting big. Even a friendly pig can bite you playing. I'm sure you have read all the how tos. Make sure they have shade and plenty of water in times of high heat. Try not to raise them in extreme heat or cold, it slows growth.

 
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Post by warminmn » Thu. Jan. 25, 2024 8:38 am

Yes to carrying a handle when with them!

I used to have some big litters and wasnt always able to farm the piglets out to other sows, which required me raising them on milk replacer, with bottles for a short time first. Those pigs I raised always thought I was their mother and would chew all over me every time I got in the pen even when large, So my first hint is not to get hand raised pigs! LOL I guess on the bright side if they got out they would have followed me back to the pen as they never left my side. But what pests! It might sound fun but it wasnt.

Raising a couple or 3 shouldnt be that difficult. They get a lot of minerals from eating dirt and love laying around in mudholes in hot weather which kids enjoy watching. Tree's grow really really good in old pig yards that are used for years. Its mostly just the smell that isnt enjoyable. Feeders can be built or bought. If your a fisherman you can keep minnows or creek chubs for bait in the water tank as a side use. I was raising mine on a few acres of grassy pasture in good weather. A smaller pen in cold weather.

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